Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

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Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Thu Mar 11, 2010 6:27 am

Aside from buying all the plants to fill a pot, what's the best way to do this? I know some species spread like wildfire, and I have adelae, but they seem to die for no reason for me. I still have some left (question about this later) that I'm hoping grow and spread in their pot, but the biggest ones are dying. Maybe buy an adult of a certain species and take leaf cuttings? I don't care what species, really. I'd also like one that would like it outside in the sun here in the PIttsburgh, PA, area, which would rule out adelae.

I have a bunch of D. tokaiensis seedlings that are tiny, so I can't look to them to fill a pot anytime soon.

Oh, the question about my D. adelae. I used to have two mama plants from Lowe's, but they die when I take them from the death cubes, but not before making little babies. Well the biggest baby (nowhere near as big as any of the mamas) has been dying off now for a month or so. It's still green, but no dew, stopped growing, not vibrant at all, wilting a little.... Would these leaves produce anything if I cut them and put them in water? My one mama plant's leaf just fell into the soil and I noticed babies growing from it before. It would be great if I could put this dying plant to some use.
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by Veronis » Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:42 am

Buy an adult of a certain species, pot it up and let it get healthy new growth to take over the old growth, then take some cuttings.

Drosera capensis can survive most weather outdoors in hardiness zone 6, which includes Pittsburgh, PA, and Harrisburg where I live. They get about 6" tall.

Capensis are sub-tropical; I think our PA winters would kill them, but in nature they often go dormant for winter even though they can be grown year-round as tropicals. So we should be able to grow them outside in the spring/summer and put them in a sunny window sill during winter anytime temps are dropping below 40ish at night.

They grow extremely easily from leaf cuttings and seed, are very hardy, and curl around trapped prey within about an hour or two.

Matt sells capensis 'Alba' (albino) but I think is out of Red, and Andrew's store has capensis Broad Leaf (standard green) and Red.

Yes you can get the cuttings to take in water. Use these links if you want details:
- http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/Prop ... _Cuttings_
- http://www.thecps.org.uk/content/view/87/40/

Alternatives to capensis would be temperates like D. intermedia, filiformis, binata, rotundifolia, anglica, etc.


Adelae are picky little jerks. ;) Here's a grow guide that will help troubleshoot it: http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/adelae.html

Most common problems with adelae are:
1. Most commonly not enough light = no dew. 12 hours or more per day with fluorescents, I'd guess at least 8 with sun.
2. If in direct sunlight for several hours a day, try 30% to 65% shade. Heck, if under strong artificial light try 30% shade.
3. Temps above 75-80ish can make it angry and it won't produce dew. Ideal temps are closer to 70 or even a little below that.
4. Not as often an issue, but play with humidity if your humidity levels are low (below ~50%). In nature I believe they're found primarily in areas with fairly high humidity.

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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:05 am

Veronis wrote:Buy an adult of a certain species, pot it up and let it get healthy new growth to take over the old growth, then take some cuttings.

Drosera capensis can survive most weather outdoors in hardiness zone 6, which includes Pittsburgh, PA, and Harrisburg where I live. They get about 6" tall.

Capensis are sub-tropical; I think our PA winters would kill them, but in nature they often go dormant for winter even though they can be grown year-round as tropicals. So we should be able to grow them outside in the spring/summer and put them in a sunny window sill during winter anytime temps are dropping below 40ish at night.

They grow extremely easily from leaf cuttings and seed, are very hardy, and curl around trapped prey within about an hour or two.

Matt sells capensis 'Alba' (albino) but I think is out of Red, and Andrew's store has capensis Broad Leaf (standard green) and Red.

Yes you can get the cuttings to take in water. Use these links if you want details:
- http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/Prop ... _Cuttings_
- http://www.thecps.org.uk/content/view/87/40/

Alternatives to capensis would be temperates like D. intermedia, filiformis, binata, rotundifolia, anglica, etc.


Adelae are picky little jerks. ;) Here's a grow guide that will help troubleshoot it: http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/adelae.html

Most common problems with adelae are:
1. Most commonly not enough light = no dew. 12 hours or more per day with fluorescents, I'd guess at least 8 with sun.
2. If in direct sunlight for several hours a day, try 30% to 65% shade. Heck, if under strong artificial light try 30% shade.
3. Temps above 75-80ish can make it angry and it won't produce dew. Ideal temps are closer to 70 or even a little below that.
4. Not as often an issue, but play with humidity if your humidity levels are low (below ~50%). In nature I believe they're found primarily in areas with fairly high humidity.


Thanks for such a detailed reply! I may just have to buy a capensis, it sounds like! I love growsundews.com, too. Aaron's guides are great. I saw on thecps.org.uk that it says "You should select a mature leaf, but not one that is already dying. I also try to choose a leaf with as few insects on as possible." My idea was to try to take leaf cuttings of my plants that are already dying, so I don't know if that will work. It can't hurt to try, I guess. The humidity level of my adelae is about 50 or a little above. It's on my dresser in my bedroom in front of a window that only gets a little morning sun.

I'm debating getting two capes to help fill the pot faster. I really like the look of filiformis and rotundifolia, too. They're not on growsundews.com, so they'll take a little more research to learn how to care for them. I see cobraplants.com has filiformis in propagation. Being that they're probably dormant this time of year, I imagine they'll pop up for sale more in the upcoming months. I didn't see rotundifolia listed on any sites for sale (I only know of three to check).

Thanks again.
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by Veronis » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:44 am

TENroaches wrote:Thanks for such a detailed reply! I may just have to buy a capensis, it sounds like! I love growsundews.com, too. Aaron's guides are great. I saw on thecps.org.uk that it says "You should select a mature leaf, but not one that is already dying. I also try to choose a leaf with as few insects on as possible." My idea was to try to take leaf cuttings of my plants that are already dying, so I don't know if that will work. It can't hurt to try, I guess. The humidity level of my adelae is about 50 or a little above. It's on my dresser in my bedroom in front of a window that only gets a little morning sun.

I'm debating getting two capes to help fill the pot faster. I really like the look of filiformis and rotundifolia, too. They're not on growsundews.com, so they'll take a little more research to learn how to care for them. I see cobraplants.com has filiformis in propagation. Being that they're probably dormant this time of year, I imagine they'll pop up for sale more in the upcoming months. I didn't see rotundifolia listed on any sites for sale (I only know of three to check).

Thanks again.


The reason not to use dying leaves is because they usually die completely before the tissue has a chance to grow plantlets. You can try with older leaves, but your success rate will be lower. I try to use newer but fully opened leaves when possible.

Filiformis (Giant version): http://www.flytrapshop.com/servlet/the- ... ant/Detail
- Andrew's plants are always healthy.

Rotundifolia: http://www.equilibriocarnivorousplants. ... t&Itemid=1
- They only ship once every month or so; I'd email them before ordering to confirm ship date.

And here's info that'll cover you on filiformis and rotundifolia care:
http://www.flytrapcare.com/store/drosera-care-sheet

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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:49 am

Veronis wrote:
TENroaches wrote:Thanks for such a detailed reply! I may just have to buy a capensis, it sounds like! I love growsundews.com, too. Aaron's guides are great. I saw on thecps.org.uk that it says "You should select a mature leaf, but not one that is already dying. I also try to choose a leaf with as few insects on as possible." My idea was to try to take leaf cuttings of my plants that are already dying, so I don't know if that will work. It can't hurt to try, I guess. The humidity level of my adelae is about 50 or a little above. It's on my dresser in my bedroom in front of a window that only gets a little morning sun.

I'm debating getting two capes to help fill the pot faster. I really like the look of filiformis and rotundifolia, too. They're not on growsundews.com, so they'll take a little more research to learn how to care for them. I see cobraplants.com has filiformis in propagation. Being that they're probably dormant this time of year, I imagine they'll pop up for sale more in the upcoming months. I didn't see rotundifolia listed on any sites for sale (I only know of three to check).

Thanks again.


The reason not to use dying leaves is because they usually die completely before the tissue has a chance to grow plantlets. You can try with older leaves, but your success rate will be lower. I try to use newer but fully opened leaves when possible.

Filiformis (Giant version): http://www.flytrapshop.com/servlet/the- ... ant/Detail
- Andrew's plants are always healthy.

Rotundifolia: http://www.equilibriocarnivorousplants. ... t&Itemid=1
- They only ship once every month or so; I'd email them before ordering to confirm ship date.

And here's info that'll cover you on filiformis and rotundifolia care:
http://www.flytrapcare.com/store/drosera-care-sheet


Thanks. Filiformis is out of stock at that link, and equilibriocarnivorousplants.com has a minimum of $50 per order, which I don't see myself meeting. Thanks for the care link.
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by Veronis » Thu Mar 11, 2010 10:10 am

Darn. Filiformis is pretty common. Here, a carnivorous plant store has some -

http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22159
http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22191

Rotundifolia is harder to find and the one place that usually carries them is sold out - http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22263

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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Thu Mar 11, 2010 10:29 am

Veronis wrote:Darn. Filiformis is pretty common. Here, a carnivorous plant store has some -

http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22159
http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22191

Rotundifolia is harder to find and the one place that usually carries them is sold out - http://www.flytraps.com/scripts/prodVie ... duct=22263


Thanks! I better act quickly; they're almost out. I saw tracyi get taller, but they're also clear instead of red. I might prefer red.

Hmmmmm! Now that I look again, binata looks like it might be some fun.
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by Doomsday » Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:30 pm

Hey. Maybe if you have some cool sundews to share, I'll trade you some capensis seed when it comes this summer.
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Thu Mar 11, 2010 1:17 pm

Doomsday wrote:Hey. Maybe if you have some cool sundews to share, I'll trade you some capensis seed when it comes this summer.


I already have (alba) capensis seed on the way. :-D
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by TENroaches » Fri Mar 12, 2010 12:58 am

Veronis wrote:Buy an adult of a certain species, pot it up and let it get healthy new growth to take over the old growth, then take some cuttings.

Drosera capensis can survive most weather outdoors in hardiness zone 6, which includes Pittsburgh, PA, and Harrisburg where I live. They get about 6" tall.

Capensis are sub-tropical; I think our PA winters would kill them, but in nature they often go dormant for winter even though they can be grown year-round as tropicals. So we should be able to grow them outside in the spring/summer and put them in a sunny window sill during winter anytime temps are dropping below 40ish at night.

They grow extremely easily from leaf cuttings and seed, are very hardy, and curl around trapped prey within about an hour or two.

Matt sells capensis 'Alba' (albino) but I think is out of Red, and Andrew's store has capensis Broad Leaf (standard green) and Red.

Yes you can get the cuttings to take in water. Use these links if you want details:
- http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/Prop ... _Cuttings_
- http://www.thecps.org.uk/content/view/87/40/

Alternatives to capensis would be temperates like D. intermedia, filiformis, binata, rotundifolia, anglica, etc.


Adelae are picky little jerks. ;) Here's a grow guide that will help troubleshoot it: http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/adelae.html

Most common problems with adelae are:
1. Most commonly not enough light = no dew. 12 hours or more per day with fluorescents, I'd guess at least 8 with sun.
2. If in direct sunlight for several hours a day, try 30% to 65% shade. Heck, if under strong artificial light try 30% shade.
3. Temps above 75-80ish can make it angry and it won't produce dew. Ideal temps are closer to 70 or even a little below that.
4. Not as often an issue, but play with humidity if your humidity levels are low (below ~50%). In nature I believe they're found primarily in areas with fairly high humidity.


I'm about to do a leaf cutting. It says to make about 1" cuts. Well my leaves are only about 1". Would it help things if I still gave the tip of the leaf a little snip to expose the inside of the leaf, instead of just having one open end (where I cut it near the base of the leaf)?
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by Doomsday » Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:57 am

if you do a leaf cutting you hsould take daily pics and make a timelapse or at least post them
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Re: Quickest/Cheapest Way to Fill a Pot with Sundews?

by roey benjamin marcus » Sun Mar 14, 2010 10:59 pm

I've heard that Pygmy Sundews produce gemmae in the fall that could easily create a bigger colony...


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