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By owlfeathers
Posts:  33
Joined:  Mon Apr 05, 2021 4:22 am
#431617
A few days ago, I repotted my new
Pinguicula primuliflora and some babies in a mixture of peat, perlite, sand, and lfsm. (Not sure of the ratio since I was just eyeballing it, but I tried to go for 1:1:1:1.) They looked great beforehand, but now they're shriveling a bit.

This is my first experience with Pings, so I don't know what's normal. One potential problem is that I used peat that I've had sitting (in the shade) on my back porch for about two years, which in retrospect may not have been the best idea. :shock: I also used coarse all-purpose sand from the garden section at Lowe's, which I think is safe but I'm not 100% sure.

I attached before and after pictures, with the "before" pictures being the ones that look better (of course).

Is this sort of response to repotting normal? Do they look like they're getting too much or too little water? Thanks in advance.
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By Huntsmanshorn
Posts:  932
Joined:  Wed Sep 03, 2014 6:32 am
#431664
owlfeathers wrote: Sun Mar 05, 2023 6:22 pm Is this sort of response to repotting normal?
No, not really. Almost seems like your plants are suffering from a sudden and severe decrease in humidity. Is that possible? If so, you might want to bag them up for a while, but watch out for mold!
owlfeathers wrote: Sun Mar 05, 2023 6:22 pmDo they look like they're getting too much or too little water?
Probably not too much. I know of people that grow them fully submerged for short periods of time to help simulate their natural environment (also useful against pests). Now I probably wouldn't do that, but it does illustrate their natural almost semiaquatic nature.

Um, you didn't transplant them and then stick them right back out in the direct sunlight, did you?
Last edited by Huntsmanshorn on Tue Mar 07, 2023 6:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
By owlfeathers
Posts:  33
Joined:  Mon Apr 05, 2021 4:22 am
#431689
I transplanted them in the evening when it was dark out, and I left them where they were before, so in the morning they would have been in the sun. I will say that the larger one seems to have bounced back a bit (two new flowers are blooming), but all but one of the tiny ones have shriveled up completely. :cry:

Should I put the pot with the baby in a darker spot? I was unaware that they shouldn't be in direct sunlight after repotting.
By Huntsmanshorn
Posts:  932
Joined:  Wed Sep 03, 2014 6:32 am
#431691
Well, generally when you repot you want to go with bright indirect light, and to the degree possible, high humidity to kind of baby the plants and allow them to recover from the trauma of being repotted. This can take a few days (maybe) for the more bulletproof plants like P. agnata to several months for delicate, slow growers, like some of the more finicky Nepenthes. In the case of primuliflora, you might be looking at a week or two of babying, all depending on your local conditions of course.
By owlfeathers
Posts:  33
Joined:  Mon Apr 05, 2021 4:22 am
#431693
Okay, thanks for the info. I live on the Gulf Coast, so I'm basically in their native climate. (Humidity below 50% is unusual here.) They sit outside under a big live oak, so they're getting mostly bright, indirect light with a few hours of direct sunlight. I now suspect that taking them out of the water was the biggest issue since the media I put them into has much better drainage than what they were in before (probably mostly peat).

ETA: What exactly does "babying" mean btw? Should I put some kind of dome or something over them to trap humidity?
By Huntsmanshorn
Posts:  932
Joined:  Wed Sep 03, 2014 6:32 am
#431705
Yup, they are water lovers, so less water could well be your issue.
What I meant by "babying" was giving them extra levels of care, for instance, more humidity, or keeping them from the harsh sun after transplant, or making sure they have ample water at all times. Stuff like that. Literally, to treat as a baby; pamper (to their needs) or be overprotective toward.
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By tommyr
Location: 
Posts:  1736
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#431849
Fall through winter I keep the LFSM I grow mine in moist only. During hot weather in summer I bring the water level up to just below the plant leaves. They seem to like that. Mine bloom their heads off from November through March /April. I give them a light misting of Schultz cactus fertilizer every 2 weeks year round. No direct Sun.
By owlfeathers
Posts:  33
Joined:  Mon Apr 05, 2021 4:22 am
#432047
Update: It seems as though the direct sunlight was definitely the culprit. I put the plants (along with some more I got from the same nursery a day or two after I made this thread) in the shade and created a sort of humidity dome/pod thing from two clear, deep plastic pot liners. The newer plants, which I never put in the direct sun, were thriving, and what was left of the old ones recovered.

Earlier, I decided to set them in the sun for a little while just to see what would happen. I don't know why I thought this would be a good idea, but it wasn't! They weren't in the sun for two hours before they started dry out :shock: so I hurriedly put them back in the shade, added more water to the tray, and misted them with cold water. I hope I didn't do any lasting damage to them!! At least now I know not to do that.
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By jeff
Posts:  551
Joined:  Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:41 pm
#432342
lack of water for sure

can also be a substrate that is too peat, at home I use either pure sphagnum or a substrate composed of 70% river sand and 30% peat, a more airy substrate so ;)

also avoid full sun for all pings, prefer a place in the shade, partial shade, or morning sun (less hot)
By tommyr
Location: 
Posts:  1736
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#434881
owlfeathers wrote: Wed Mar 15, 2023 7:59 pm Update: It seems as though the direct sunlight was definitely the culprit. I put the plants (along with some more I got from the same nursery a day or two after I made this thread) in the shade and created a sort of humidity dome/pod thing from two clear, deep plastic pot liners. The newer plants, which I never put in the direct sun, were thriving, and what was left of the old ones recovered.

Earlier, I decided to set them in the sun for a little while just to see what would happen. I don't know why I thought this would be a good idea, but it wasn't! They weren't in the sun for two hours before they started dry out :shock: so I hurriedly put them back in the shade, added more water to the tray, and misted them with cold water. I hope I didn't do any lasting damage to them!! At least now I know not to do that.
Yeah I find they do NOT like direct Sun at all. BRIGHT shade is all mine get. I grow mine in pure long fiber sphagnum moss. Fall through winter/early spring the moss is just kept damp. In summer when temps get 90 F. or higher I bring the water level up to just below the root zone. I lightly spray every 2 weeks with Schultz Cactus fertilizer per California Carnivores. No dormancy needed, mine are 2 years old. I started with 2 plants and now have a whole bunch.

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