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How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 1:30 pm
by NZL
Hi guys,

Since i'm going to start experimenting with TC somewhere in the second half of this year [after I've moved into a bigger house], I'm already gathering information and I stumbled upon a nice PDF document explaining how to create your own Laminar Flow Hood.

People who'd like to try and build one of their own or people who're only interested can click here

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 4:34 pm
by Matt
Thanks for the link Niels. I'm definitely going to put one together some day once my life settles down a bit!

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 4:39 pm
by WORMSS
Ok, being silly here.. but...
make a what?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 5:33 pm
by nepaholic
This is the Flowhood of Lotte and Thomas in Germany. I build my flowhood after this plans.
The german Orchid People also swear on this plan if you exactly use what they do, the blower, and both filters. Everything is exactly calculated that is works.

Jens

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:13 pm
by Steve_D
NZL wrote:... a nice PDF document explaining how to create your own Laminar Flow Hood. People who'd like to try and build one of their own or people who're only interested can click here


THANK YOU Niels! Great guide and resource. I swear I'm going to get into tissue culture again someday, after my first depressing attempt a couple years ago.

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:34 am
by WORMSS
again... i will ask...

a what?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 3:46 am
by Steve_D
WORMSS wrote:again... i will ask... a what?


A laminar flow hood is a partially enclosed work area for tissue culture in which microorganism-free air constantly and smoothly moves from the back of the work area toward the front opening. This clean (sterile) moving air in this enclosed area (open only at the front, with a HEPA filter in back to filter out microbes) keeps microorganisms in the air outside the laminar flow hood from entering through the front opening into the enclosed work space, preventing contamination of the sterilized plant tissue and the (commonly agar-based) sterile media.

A laminar flow hood simply creates a sterile workspace to do tissue culture. Because the person doing the tissue culture must use his or her hands and manipulate materials in the workspace, that workspace must necessarily have an opening to allow this manipulation to happen. The "laminar flow" (smooth movement without vortices or many irregularities) of sterile air through the workspace and outward, pushing any and all microbe-filled air away from the opening of the workspace, keeps everything within the workspace clean and sterile (in theory anyway). :D

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 7:59 am
by NZL
For all people that have plans on building this LFH, I have an extra suggestion that's not in the pdf.
If you're a perfectionist like me, you should consider fixing a blacklight (or other UV light) in the hood area on the 'ceiling' just before the HEPA filter.
Then, when you're planning to do a TC session, turn your UV light on for about an hour before you start working under the hood.
When working, turn it off, and when you're finished, you can turn it back on at your own discretion.

Please note that the UV light is an extra hood sterilization procedure. It does not replace the other sterilization procedures, so please keep cleaning your hood with high % alcohol etc etc.

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 4:58 pm
by Steve_D
NZL wrote:...you should consider fixing a blacklight (or other UV light) in the hood area on the 'ceiling' just before the HEPA filter.


Niels, when you say "before" the HEPA filter, do you mean in relation to the air flow? (Should the UV light be in the same chamber as the HEPA filter, enclosed and not visible?) Or do you mean mounted to the upper surface at the back of the open workspace area of the laminar flow hood, visible and just in front of the HEPA filter as viewed from the open front of the laminar flow hood?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:59 pm
by NZL
The latter,
it should shine on the work area. This way, most of the fungi, bacteria and spores will only be doing one thing in there when you're not working. And that is dying ;)

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 10:52 pm
by floridadancerguy
When I clicked the link for the flow hood it said file not found. Anyone else have this problem?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 3:33 am
by goldslinger
Yea, I can't get the link to work either. . . :cry:

EDIT; HERE IT IS ! !

http://www.orchideenvermehrung.at/english/index.htm

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 11:30 am
by shamRockk
Hello,

Im interested in a laminar flow hood to work with tissue culture.
There are many DIY instructions but Im wondering if you can make a real laminar flow which works as effective as a professional one and save much money.
Does anybody know the cheapest price for a small, new professional laminar flow hood?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:41 pm
by Dionae
Looks easy enough to build but those filters are so expensive. I wonder if a smaller version would work for my needs? Anything should be better than a plastic tote turned on its side right:p?

Re: How to build your own Laminar Flow Hood

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 5:40 pm
by nepaholic
Guys, i build one of these and it work awesome. I can let jars and material inside the hood for hours without any contamination.
If you want a cheap hobby, give it up.

TC is still science and if you dont want to spend money for this then make some "fake TC" with PPM and other stuff....

btw my flowhood is in use since years and i never changed a filter on it...