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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258174
I stumbled across this guy last night while talking to one of my neighbors. Long story short it was given to him by a friend he knows, and now I have it. He said it was a Yuarani B, I think?

It's appears pretty rough, but I seen the new green at the bottom, so I'm hoping I can save it.

I removed it from the what looked like pure sphagnum it was in, and got it soaking in distilled while I moved some LSFM around from some other pots. I shredded the long fiber and added about 20-30% perlite. I ended up potting it and a division it had madeImage . Now they're hopefully trying to recuperate in my terrarium. The brown parts are kind of speckled from what I can see, which is kind of concerning.

Any input or advice on what you guys and gals see, or think I should do. I would love to have my neighbor over one day and show him a mature Heliamphora, and possibly give him the division as a thank you since he gave it to me.

Thanks in advance!

Image

Image



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By tothkonrad33
Posts:  77
Joined:  Sat Mar 19, 2016 6:26 pm
#258177
It looks like it didn't get anywhere near enough sunlight...

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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258184
Well hopefully my T5 will remedy that issue. I'm kind of worried I didn't get to it soon enough, as even the tops of the new growth are browning (dieing off).

Thanks!



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By nimbulan
Posts:  2076
Joined:  Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:03 pm
#258190
Just leave it alone in your terrarium. Leaving it to recuperate in proper and stable conditions is the best thing you can do for it. I'm afraid you likely set it back even further by unpotting it since Helis do not like root disturbance very much, but there's nothing that can be done about that now.

Don't be too worried about it dying back, and be patient! I got some Helis last year and one of them lost more than half its pitchers before it started growing again while the other sulked for nearly 6 months.
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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258192
Thank you Nimbulan! I was recently informed that these guys like light, and airy soil that's why I figured I would be best off to repot it now, and suck up the downtime since I've read they are slow growers. My thought process was two disturbances at once would be better than one now, and one later.

Just for my future reference. When and what would be the best way to fertilize these guys? I have a diluted mix of Maxsea (I believe it is 1/4 teaspoon to a gallon of water) that I've been using that on my Sarrs on a bi weekly basis.

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By Benurmanii
Posts:  2000
Joined:  Fri Aug 07, 2015 4:34 pm
#258194
It doesn't look etiolated to me. Actually, it really doesn't look too bad. Keep in mind, since you repotted it, it will look pretty bad for a while. Make sure you keep the humidity high (70% min is good, I like to keep mine around 80-90). I wouldn't fertilize it until you see new growth emerging. It's easy to over-do it with Helis, so lightly fertilize them once you are sure it is growing again with diluted maxsea (1/4 tsp per gallon of water), 1-2 drops in one pitcher to play it safe.

I'm not an expert, so you could probably get some more detailed advice elsewhere, but this is what I have observed and what has worked in my experience.
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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258197
Thank you Benurmanii! I'm running between 70-80% humidity during their photoperiod, which I believe gets to about 90% at night. I haven't really worried to much about the humidity once the light is out, since it naturally climbs anyways.

At what frequency should I fertilize it? Once a month? Or can I put it on the same schedule as my Sarrs, every two weeks? Once it starts actively growing again of course. I'll be patiently awaiting the day it starts to ,"grow like a beast in slow motion."

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By chevyguy8893
Posts:  413
Joined:  Fri Aug 01, 2014 12:32 am
#258215
Overall, I do agree they look like healthy plants (both the pitchers and roots look good). Personally, I would bag the plants to keep the humidity as high as possible (airing them out every so often) until new growth emerges, and then begin to slowly lower it down to the humidity in the terrarium. My terrarium is kept around the same humidity and I have found them to adapt faster, and with far less damage, by doing so.

There is a lot of useful information in the following link from a grower that is very experienced with this genera. http://bluegrasscarnivores.com/helipage/newdiv.html

As for fertilization, mine were fertilized on a bi-weekly basis by filling up the pitchers with maxsea at 1/2 tsp per gallon under strong lighting and it worked well. I only used it at that amount since that is what I use for my Sarracenia. Since then I have dropped it back to 1/4 tsp per gallon and only fertilize once a month, and the growth has remained the same under my conditions. So, it may have been a waste to use it at the high amount per gallon, but there was not any harm done either.
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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258218
Thank you chevyguy! That is a very informative article. Which brings me to a couple questions now. Should I attempt to feed the couple browning pitchers before I bag it, since it's such a small plant? Would it be best to wait a year or two to replant it since I didn't have the APS? Or should I just pick it up tomorrow and do it while it's still pretty shocked?

Thanks for your time and insight!



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By chevyguy8893
Posts:  413
Joined:  Fri Aug 01, 2014 12:32 am
#258225
boarderlib wrote:Thank you chevyguy! That is a very informative article. Which brings me to a couple questions now. Should I attempt to feed the pitchers before I bag it, since it's such a small plant? Would it be best to wait a year or two to replant it since I didn't have the APS? Or should I just pick it up tomorrow and do it while it's still pretty shocked?

Thanks for your time and insight!
Yes, if you can get fertilizer into the small pitchers it will help, but, from experience, it can be hard to do that. I use small pipettes to do it and even then I have issues filling the pitcher with more than a drop. I suppose a small amount is better than none though.

Given that you have already repotted it into a good mixture you should be fine. I would just pay attention to the watering and keep it moist without drying out entirely, but not constantly saturated (i.e. standing in a lot of water) if you choose to not repot them for now. Mine grow well with strong root systems in either 100% dried Sphagnum or a mix of dried and live Sphagnum. Other plants (not Heliamphora) that I have potted in mixes using APS do seem to do better than their counterparts in Sphagnum only, but that is just my own observations. Repotting them again could risk root damage, but bagging them would give them time to adjust and grow new roots and pitchers. Also, as you have already pointed out, they are already stressed one way or another. Ultimately, it is up to you though. Despite their finicky reputation, given the right conditions most of the species and hybrids are easy to grow.
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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258282
chevyguy8893 wrote:
Yes, if you can get fertilizer into the small pitchers it will help, but, from experience, it can be hard to do that. I use small pipettes to do it and even then I have issues filling the pitcher with more than a drop. I suppose a small amount is better than none though.

Given that you have already repotted it into a good mixture you should be fine. I would just pay attention to the watering and keep it moist without drying out entirely, but not constantly saturated (i.e. standing in a lot of water) if you choose to not repot them for now. Mine grow well with strong root systems in either 100% dried Sphagnum or a mix of dried and live Sphagnum. Other plants (not Heliamphora) that I have potted in mixes using APS do seem to do better than their counterparts in Sphagnum only, but that is just my own observations. Repotting them again could risk root damage, but bagging them would give them time to adjust and grow new roots and pitchers. Also, as you have already pointed out, they are already stressed one way or another. Ultimately, it is up to you though. Despite their finicky reputation, given the right conditions most of the species and hybrids are easy to grow.
Thank you so much again! You have been a huge help! I bagged them up as soon as I got home last night, so that part is squared away now. I'll give feeding the pitchers a shot tonight when I get home and open the bag to let it breath for a second. Would taking the bag off for say a minute everyday be a sufficient amount of time to clear the air in there? Or should that be done every few days?

I think I'll just follow your suggestion and not repot, since my media mix is pretty good. As has been noted these guys do not like their roots being disturbed, how often do you repot? I've read some say a year or two. Ideally I would like to get them into the live sphagnum mix probably the next time I have to repot. I love the way Heli's look with that live sphagnum covering the top of the pot. With the media mix I'm using would I be best to tray water for about thirty minutes and take it out or leave it sit in say an inch of water(I'm thinking this is more of a saturated)? They are currently in some small FTS pots that I had laying around, the 4¼ inch tall round ones.

I really appreciate your time and knowledge, so thank you very much!

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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#258331
Thanks for your time and insight Benurmanii!

I had already attempted to feed the bigger division before I saw this, since I was in a hurry to get my newest addition fed and bagged up (I got a few presents in the mail today). I just tried while I had the stuff out. It was quite the futile attempt though. I didn't even manage to get one drop in the only open pitcher. I guess I'm going shopping for a smaller pipette for future use once the twins get big enough.

The smaller one I just opened the bag for a second and bagged it back up. I would have needed a needle to feed it, since there was really no open pitchers.

Now they'll be left alone, except for airing out until I start seeing new growth. Then bag cutting little bit by little bit. Come on little guys!

I would like to say thank you to everybody who has helped coax me through this, and fed me the information. Hopefully one day i can get these guys to be as beautiful as some of yours. Thank you!

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By boarderlib
Posts:  1639
Joined:  Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:13 pm
#260833
Just a quick update. I lost the bigger division to spider mites. I used a miticide on both plants, since I believe that's where the mites came from. The smaller division is finally starting to put out new pitchers, so cutting off the bag has begun once a week.

Here's a pic of the little guy.
Image

Thanks again for everyone's help!

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