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Discuss any carnivorous plant that doesn't fit in the above categories here or general chat about carnivorous plants

Moderator: Matt

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By Ishaha
Posts:  423
Joined:  Thu May 28, 2015 10:12 am
#237814
I have mine a 50:50 perlite LFS. But it seems that Matt grows it in 100%, at least that is how they are shipped and grown.
By SerMuncherIV
Posts:  1205
Joined:  Sun May 31, 2015 5:59 pm
#237815
Many CPs will tolerate 100% LFS to some extent, they won't do as well compared to their preferred soil media, but they won't die either. There are a bunch of notable exceptions; Drosophyllum will most certainly die if you keep it in 100% pure LFS, and trickier plants like N. edwardsiana and tuberous Drosera with very specific soil requirements will die as well. For obvious reasons, fully aquatic Utricularia and Aldrovanda will also perform poorly in 100% LFS. Many Pinguicula will almost certainly succumb to root rot in 100% LFS. Most of the time, it isn't the soil chemistry of the Sphagnum itself that kills these plants; rather, it's the fact that it remains far too wet and compacts far too much for many plants to tolerate (One exception is N. campanulata - although the wetness certainly doesn't help, it's ultimately the lack of alkalinity in the Sphagnum that makes the plant weaker and more susceptible to pathogens).
Last edited by SerMuncherIV on Sun Jul 26, 2015 11:44 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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By w03
Posts:  393
Joined:  Tue Jul 15, 2014 12:46 am
#237923
Not all Pinguicula will rot in 100% LFS - the temperate species and some of the Mexican species with homophyllous growth type (e.g. P. emarginata) do well in it.

Smaller terrestrial Utricularia like U. pubescens while adaptable, will definitely struggle in it. LFS is simply too big and chunky for some species. Conversely, certain epiphytic species may not like how wet 100% LFS is (though many do well in it).

As mentioned before, Drosophyllum will definitely die in straight LFS, and Cephalotus may rot in it. Some Nepenthes may also find it too wet.

Other than that, some Drosera and Genlisea do better in peat mixes, but generally won't die (with the exception of the tuberous species).

But what works for one person may or may not work for someone else, etc. It's best to try find the mixes that work for you.
By w03
Posts:  393
Joined:  Tue Jul 15, 2014 12:46 am
#237926
You didn't imply that all disliked it, I just clarified a bit. ;)
Interesting point about N. campanulata too - I wonder if the actual soil chemistry might be responsible for the difficulty of some of the UHL species that live in ultramafic soils.
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By Cory
Posts:  1149
Joined:  Sat Jul 27, 2013 5:42 pm
#237927
w03 wrote:You didn't imply that all disliked it, I just clarified a bit. ;)
Interesting point about N. campanulata too - I wonder if the actual soil chemistry might be responsible for the difficulty of some of the UHL species that live in ultramafic soils.
I believe it is. I use specific orchid ferts on some neps that grow in these regions

They grow much better with it.

Peat lfs and perlite watered with RO water leaves a completely empty mix (hydroponic). Some of the things they get in the wild must be replaced
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