FlytrapCare Carnivorous Plant Forums

Sponsored by FlytrapStore.com

Discuss any carnivorous plant that doesn't fit in the above categories here or general chat about carnivorous plants

Moderator: Matt

By Snap Traps
Posts:  402
Joined:  Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:15 pm
#191676
This is a miniature rose I bought from a hardware store some time back. I didn't think much of it, never fertilized it or given it much sunshine. When I was looking at the long, leggy stems this morning I saw what seem to be sundew tentacles, glistening. The beads of mucus was sticky, though small. This phenomenon only occurred in the new shoots, which grew the plant was in my "care". To test if it's truly carnivorous I placed minute pieces of cheese on the tentacles. I'll update tomorrow on whether they are
digested.

Here's my theory behind this. The rose was carnivorous or is entering a carnivorous phase in its evolution. I can tell because some of the tentacles are mutated versions of spines; its leaf shape is well adapted to a carnivorous nature. Through the lack of care and a far from ideal environment, it activated its insectivorous nature to survive.

Here are some pictures of the tentacles, sorry for the resolution of my point and shoot camera :P .
Attachments:
Carnivorous???
Carnivorous???
cp rose1.jpg (92.01 KiB) Viewed 1971 times
A tentacle part of the leaf.
A tentacle part of the leaf.
cp rose2.jpg (178.28 KiB) Viewed 1971 times
A section of the leaf evolving to or from a carnivorous phase.
A section of the leaf evolving to or from a carnivorous phase.
cp rose 3.jpg (142.78 KiB) Viewed 1971 times
User avatar
By roarke
Location: 
Posts:  2373
Joined:  Sun Nov 08, 2009 3:11 am
#191681
No, is not. But your theory is interesting... Do you know what rose do you have ? Some non-carnivorous plants do this for various reasons.
Code: Select all
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucilage
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinia_hispida
Robinia hispida exhibit mucilage on seed pods. I cannot find the photo.
roarke liked this
By Snap Traps
Posts:  402
Joined:  Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:15 pm
#191691
No I don't know the exact parentage. Guess it's a common occurrence then.
User avatar
By roarke
Location: 
Posts:  2373
Joined:  Sun Nov 08, 2009 3:11 am
#191724
I forget to tell you. See the quote from my link. The plant i had grow, but not anymore, had mucilage, most if the plant was young, on the stalks and when the leaves begin to form. If i was to stick a insect, would stick on the dew. But i didn't know the plant name and died. And didn't tried any experiment on it before it died.
Added another image. Red stipule can be seen and the leaves grow from the center.
Code: Select all
http://www.flytrapcare.com/phpBB3/unknown-plants-part-2-t18797.html
By Snap Traps
Posts:  402
Joined:  Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:15 pm
#191733
That is probably for protection but I see no reason for a rose to suddenly start producing mucilage on the stem. It's not attacked by pests and the section of stem is relatively old growth anyway.
By TheAlmightyDoge
Posts:  12
Joined:  Wed Dec 11, 2013 12:42 pm
#194209
It might be a sugary substance to attract ants, which will protect the plants against other predators? The acacia tree also does this to attract ants which attack any animal that tries to eat the tree's leaves
TheAlmightyDoge liked this
Hats off to yall

Dean please stop crying man your embarrassing m[…]

About a week has passed, I thought more might sign[…]

There you go. However, I did forget to say that th[…]

Albino Cape seed giveaway

Welcome back. (Audience cheers) The winners are Ux[…]

Burmannii stay small, little over an inch wide, ma[…]

Greetings from USA

I don’t know what’s worse. You dad get[…]

SASE received. Order is fulfilled. Return envelope[…]

Not if you can break it up into a size appropriate[…]

Support the community - Shop at FlytrapStore.com!