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By jht-union
Posts:  3205
Joined:  Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:43 pm
#135296
Hello everyone,

before proceeding to look at the pics, I would like to share my experience and what I saw.... for being first time I was really pleased with what I saw and learned a lot. I have yet to see more areas in the souther NC counties. My future plan is to go somewhere around the Lake Waccamaw area and being able to see VFT's in their native habitat.

There were three different sites I saw, site 1 being the largest of the other two as I ran out of time and wasn't able to look more in depth into site 3 and Site 2, Site 2 was completely burned down due to fire I don't know if by humans or nature.

Day of the trip: March 24, 2012

Site 1:
Sarracenias, Droseras, and Utricularias were growing in clear areas where the sun can directly penetrate. In a few areas in site 1 light was limited due to the tall grass which gave more shade to the plants. Some plants were cover completely by the grass and other Non-Carnivorous plants around.
Most Carnivorous Plants were growing where water was almost present most of the time. Even some were growing in almost all water or partially submerged.
I was able to see that they like really wet and humid conditions(perhaps raining?).
I wanted to dig a hole around some CP's to see how the soil looked like below the ground but I didn't want to disturb the plants, maybe next time I will do that but will be very careful not to disturb plants.
Another interesting see I saw in this site is that each species grows together (not in clumps for some) within feet or inches of each other, and then once I move to one area then I started seeing another species, they like to live in small communities but not in clumps( for some areas). For example Sarracenia purpurea was one that live close together to other Sarracenias purpureas but didn't live in clumps while Sarracenia flava live in clumps and also in small communities. This is also true for the Droseras I saw which I think were Drosera rotundifolia or capillaries. Saw very little Drosera intermedias.
There were swampy areas where Utricularia Inflata(not sure if it is or not u. inflata) was present, I would say this was probably the most common aquatic CP in Site 1.
I measured the solids in Site 1 in different locations and the results were good to what it is considered good for Carnivorous Plants.
The readings in the areas were: 36, 28, 28, 32, 25, 21, 21, 22.

The Droseras I found were living in really wet areas, really peaty areas close to the small swamps and also lived in small groups next to each other in groups of 8 or so.
D. intermedia I saw very little of these in Site 1 and 3. None in Site 2.
One thing to note is that where the CP's were, Live Moss was present most of the time, very interesting to see that very few were growing on the moss, instead they grew next to it or near it.


The Sarracenias I saw were Sarracenia Purpurea, Sarracenia Flava, and Sarracenia X Catesbaei. I don't think there were any of the other Sarracenias in all 3 sites.
Most, if not all of the Sarracenias were making flower stalks and most of the growth was just coming up, for some they didn't even look like making pitchers but instead were making flower buds. Sarracenia purpurea were probably the most diverse in Site 1, and in all of the other areas where it was growing in wet conditions very close to the swampy areas and some were growing farther away in more drier conditions.

For Sarracenia flava, I found them not as widespread as Sarracenia purpurea. They were more concentrated in specific areas and were in more clumps in groups of 5 or more. One area in site 1 there were about 12 and up of Sarracenias flavas in a clump. Found these growing closer to the swampy areas and very few were growing in drier conditions.

Sarracenia X catesbaei I found not a lot of these compare to Sarracenia Flava and Sarracenia purpurea.

In general I was surprised to see that most of the Sarracenias were growing in very very wet conditions and even some were partially submerged.

Site 2 was much more smaller than site 1 and site 3 due to the burning of basically the whole area. The amount of solids in the water for Site 2 were 27 and 26.
I only found Sarracenia Purpurea which were burned too. There was a lot of moss in this area too which was growing almost completely submerged in water.

Site 3 was a bit hard to get to because of the tall grass in a section but it was worthy!
I covered just a few minutes in this area due to the time :( .
The amount of solids in this area was 18 and 18, and 18 in different areas.
This area was much more drier than Site 1 and 2. Plants here were also much more bigger than the plants in Site 1, and Site 2.
I mainly found in this area tons of Sarracenia Purpurea. I only found one clump of Sarracenia X catesbaei. The Droseras were larger in this site. In this site the tall grass was even covering more of the plants but they still received tons of light anyway, and again, some areas were more open than others.

This was my experience, I learned a lot from looking to these three sites and hope to learn more whenever I have the chance to going again.
It took me about four hours to see all 3 sites and all was worthy! :)

Hope you enjoy the pictures and feel free to comment on anything. I also need help Identifying some plants such as Utricularias and Droseras( which is either between Capillaris and Rotundifolia.

Site 1:

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Anyone knows what is this?

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And this?

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Can you identify this Utricularia?
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Look to that big worm in the plant to the right:

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Probably D. intermedia:

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S. X catesbaei:

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Another one???

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I am pretty sure this is an utric, but what is it?

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Perhaps U. Juncea????

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S. X catesbaei:

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Site 2

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small fungi:

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Site 3

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S. X catesbaei:

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Close-ups:

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Thanks for looking! :)
Last edited by jht-union on Mon Mar 26, 2012 11:16 pm, edited 3 times in total.
jht-union liked this
By jht-union
Posts:  3205
Joined:  Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:43 pm
#135916
So I changed my plans,

But I did saw Sarras, droseras, utrics...... There were so many plants! :)

I went to croatan national forest, I'm glad I ended up going there.

Pics will be posted sometime soon! ;)
By jht-union
Posts:  3205
Joined:  Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:43 pm
#136023
Wahter wrote:Looking forward to seeing those photos jht!

I don't know when I'll be going out to the coast again. Were there many/ any moquitoes, chiggers, and ticks?

Not at all. I guess mosquitoes aren't common this time of the year yet. Also there were a ton of aquatic utrics so I doubt that the larvae can grow.


Pics will be posted here tomorrow! :)
By pieguy452
Posts:  2460
Joined:  Sun May 22, 2011 11:09 pm
#136102
Wow, these are great pictures. I've always wanted to see carnivorous plants in nature. Must have been an amazing trip :)

Thanks for sharing all of these wonderful photos!
By Veronis
Posts:  2200
Joined:  Fri May 29, 2009 8:41 pm
#136247
Thanks for taking the time to post the pics. :)

Those purps look awesome, and it's very cool that you got to see a naturally occurring hybrid (S. x catesbaie) on your visit. :)

Catesbaei and purp ssp venosa were the first two Sarrs I ever purchased/owned.
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