FlytrapCare Carnivorous Plant Forums

Sponsored by FlytrapStore.com

Ask questions about how to grow and care for Venus Flytraps

Moderator: Matt

By Lado
Posts:  6
Joined:  Wed Sep 25, 2019 2:14 pm
#346662
How cold is the room they are in? They need to be in temperatures of around 33-45 F ideally.


couple times it went lower than 33 F. around 28-30 F and stayed for two or three days. I just wonder if that color is good. they are too red.
By tommyr
Location: 
Posts:  1549
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#346664
Lado wrote:How cold is the room they are in? They need to be in temperatures of around 33-45 F ideally.


couple times it went lower than 33 F. around 28-30 F and stayed for two or three days. I just wonder if that color is good. they are too red.
They look fine to me. They look like a red variety.
tommyr liked this
By RhysKi
Posts:  60
Joined:  Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:53 pm
#346897
Hi all,
I have a small dilemma: my venus flytraps are only 4-5 months old and just about 1-2 mm tall. I live on the line of the 5a / 5b zone in Indiana and our winters get extremely harsh, windy, and cold most of the time (or bounce between near 0/the teens F and 30-50 F degree weather). I'm wondering if I should attempt to have them go into dormancy their first year or not.

In this topic, I have found the following information:
"Let’s talk about hibernating small plants now. As we know, they are more vulnerable to unfriendly conditions, such as lack of light and lower temperatures. Technically, putting them into dormancy isn’t that hard and can be beneficial, but it should be tried by more experienced growers. Beginners can skip the dormancy of small plants (up to 4-5 cm, 1,5-2 inches), without having to worry about negative effects. Seedlings can be “cheated” simply by repotting them.

Smaller plants don’t need dormancy
But, is it really beneficial to hibernate smaller VFT’s? The answer is: yes, it is. They grow better then and reach the mature size faster. You should be careful about it, tough. It might be better not to hibernate them, if they are your first and only plants. If you can assure them the right conditions, you can give it a try. If not, there’s nothing wrong if you wait until they reach a bigger size and hibernate them the next year."

This would indicate to me that while it may be beneficial for them to hibernate, since I am not as experienced, since it's so terrible in winter here, and because they are so young it may not be the best idea. However, Matt - the admin - also mentioned to me that I could go either way but that without dormancy (even the first year) they could not grow very well next season (or even perish possibly) without the break.

I'm torn... Seeing as there are conflicting opinions/suggestions, I would love to hear any feedback from any experienced growers in a similar area / situation. It would be greatly appreciated!
By tommyr
Location: 
Posts:  1549
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#346900
You can skip it this year.
By RhysKi
Posts:  60
Joined:  Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:53 pm
#346903
tommyr wrote:You can skip it this year.
That would be great! I had a batch before that grew fantastically in the first 8-9 months with explosive growth; and I had skipped dormancy then as well. However, they didn't make it much longer after winter (I believe because it appeared the soil compacted and did not drain well - I've learned from that peat soil-only mistake and have changed my ways with the suggested peat moss/perlite mix and bottom watering method) but they also seemed to want to go dormant just before the time they started looking weak. I just don't want to lose these guys too in Spring once dormancy time has passed and they happen to look "tired" or not grow well as I've read on here from a couple of other posts... being paranoid I guess?
By tommyr
Location: 
Posts:  1549
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#346911
RhysKi wrote:
tommyr wrote:You can skip it this year.
That would be great! I had a batch before that grew fantastically in the first 8-9 months with explosive growth; and I had skipped dormancy then as well. However, they didn't make it much longer after winter (I believe because it appeared the soil compacted and did not drain well - I've learned from that peat soil-only mistake and have changed my ways with the suggested peat moss/perlite mix and bottom watering method) but they also seemed to want to go dormant just before the time they started looking weak. I just don't want to lose these guys too in Spring once dormancy time has passed and they happen to look "tired" or not grow well as I've read on here from a couple of other posts... being paranoid I guess?
It's safe to skip the first year. Something else must have done them in. Try keeping the moist but not sitting in water until the weather warms up a lot. Lots of light.
tommyr liked this
User avatar
By Matt
Location: 
Posts:  21536
Joined:  Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:28 pm
#346944
I've tried skipping dormancy for flytraps several times over the years and have always regretted it. The plants usually stall mid-way through the following growing season and then struggle until the receive a proper dormancy. Sometimes they die as they get tired of growing and struggling. And, when compared to plants in the same conditions and similar size that receive a proper dormancy, the ones that skipped dormancy are always smaller the following growing season.

For those reasons, I almost never recommend skipping dormancy for flytraps of any size regardless of their current status. It almost always works out better to just get them on a regular seasonal cycle as soon as possible and let them do their natural thing.
By RhysKi
Posts:  60
Joined:  Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:53 pm
#346949
Matt wrote:I've tried skipping dormancy for flytraps several times over the years and have always regretted it. The plants usually stall mid-way through the following growing season and then struggle until the receive a proper dormancy. Sometimes they die as they get tired of growing and struggling. And, when compared to plants in the same conditions and similar size that receive a proper dormancy, the ones that skipped dormancy are always smaller the following growing season.

For those reasons, I almost never recommend skipping dormancy for flytraps of any size regardless of their current status. It almost always works out better to just get them on a regular seasonal cycle as soon as possible and let them do their natural thing.
I see. Would 2 months be enough for dormancy for their size? Again, I'm just terribly afraid to simply set them outside after they've grown used to the indoor heater and lamp, knowing that come January/February things are going to get really cold (often teens to below zero at times and wind chills that make things even colder.) However, if that is how it must be done to ensure they do not struggle and die as a result, I'll do what's necessary.
User avatar
By Matt
Location: 
Posts:  21536
Joined:  Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:28 pm
#346951
RhysKi wrote:Would 2 months be enough for dormancy for their size?
Yes. Eight to ten weeks of even just a light dormancy is usually enough for flytraps to grow well the following season.
RhysKi wrote:Again, I'm just terribly afraid to simply set them outside after they've grown used to the indoor heater and lamp, knowing that come January/February things are going to get really cold (often teens to below zero at times and wind chills that make things even colder.)
If it is that cold, you definitely don't want to put them outside and leave them outside. I would suggest a sunny windowsill on the very cold days and moving them outdoors whenever it is above freezing.

Hope that helps!
Matt liked this
User avatar
By Viko89
Location: 
Posts:  58
Joined:  Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:22 pm
#347291
I guess you meant to say "Eight to ten WEEKS of dormancy..." ;)
Matt wrote:
RhysKi wrote:Would 2 months be enough for dormancy for their size?
Yes. Eight to ten months of even just a light dormancy is usually enough for flytraps to grow well the following season.
..."
Viko89 liked this
By RhysKi
Posts:  60
Joined:  Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:53 pm
#347409
Yes, 8-10 weeks, okay thanks!
When moving them from warmer temps to the lower temps outside, do I slowly acclimate them to those new temperatures or just put them out (in protective plastic of course) and let them figure it out for themselves? We've had unusually good weather the last few weeks for January in our area, around 40-50 daytime and high 20's to 30's in the evening (F). Would that be warm and yet cool enough to acclimate them to the outdoors for dormancy?
By Benny
Location: 
Posts:  463
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:46 pm
#347761
Hi,

I got my flytrap in late december, and was told that I don't need to put it into dormancy, as it is too late. I would like to make cuttings off of this plant, but I was also told that the plants cuttings do best if taken during the spring (right after dormancy). My plants leaves look that they are in the shape of spring/summer leaves so am I able to take cuttings from it, or should I wait next year in the spring?
Thanks!
User avatar
By DesertPat
Posts:  295
Joined:  Mon May 20, 2013 10:42 pm
#347769
Benny wrote:Hi,

I got my flytrap in late december, and was told that I don't need to put it into dormancy, as it is too late. I would like to make cuttings off of this plant, but I was also told that the plants cuttings do best if taken during the spring (right after dormancy). My plants leaves look that they are in the shape of spring/summer leaves so am I able to take cuttings from it, or should I wait next year in the spring?
Thanks!
I would hang off a year myself. Just treat the plant right, give it what it needs and let it adapt to its new growing conditions. If everything goes well your plant will send out divisions from its rhizome which are much better (IMO) than trying to get pullings to root. Put it into dormancy next year and then you can definitely think about other methods of propogating.

Patrick
DesertPat, DesertPat liked this
  • 1
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
Any U. Bisquimata tips

Oh my god! Never spend your precious sphag on such[…]

I got another Sarracenia from a store since it lo[…]

Sundew pics

Glad you like them. I wish I could tell you the se[…]

Seeds recieved

Downsizing My Collection

Added pictures too. 20201205_141311~2.jpg 202[…]

Dying Pitcher

So in your opinion ChefDean, I should feed with Os[…]

Thanks Mike, that's some great advice. This is a n[…]

Now that the flush of first of the month seed orde[…]

Support the community - Shop at FlytrapStore.com!