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By That one plant boi
Posts:  280
Joined:  Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:34 pm
#358455
Hello!
Lately I've been searching around on the topic of S. Purpurea and its lighting requirements and have come across a few discussions stating that purpurea enjoys less light then the taller sarracenia. I have my purpur's growing in full sun with my other sarrs in central Florida and while my taller sarrs are doing fine, my purps look kind of ratty.

So I was wondering if I should move them to an area with a bit more shade in order to protect them from the heat?

Quick bonus question; what is the most heat tolerant sarracenia?

Thanks guys!

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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By sanguinearocks101
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Posts:  1163
Joined:  Mon Jan 06, 2020 1:56 am
#358458
It definitely makes sense for it to like less sun, I think you should experiment. Take 2 of the most similar plants, preferably genetically identical, and put one in lower lighting leave the other how it is. Make sure they get similar amounts of prey. Take before and after pictures and compare.
By Benny
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Posts:  453
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:46 pm
#358461
In the wild, Purps are hiding behind the larger Sarracenia and grasses. If you position the pots where the S. Purpurea is in the shade of your other plants during the heat of the day, they should be fine. If not, just move it to a shadier spot.
TrooperKris2, MikeB liked this
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By Panman
Posts:  282
Joined:  Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:41 pm
#358470
I also think there may be a difference between the subspecies purpurea and venosa. I believe purpurea is generally a more northern plant whereas venosa is further south.
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By sanguinearocks101
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Posts:  1163
Joined:  Mon Jan 06, 2020 1:56 am
#358541
Panman wrote: Wed Jul 08, 2020 7:18 pm I also think there may be a difference between the subspecies purpurea and venosa. I believe purpurea is generally a more northern plant whereas venosa is further south.
Purpurea purpurea is much more cold tolerant than purpurea venosa. I live near one of the overlap zones between the 2 ssp so if I ever visit it I won’t even bother trying to identify what ssp they are.
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By MikeB
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Posts:  182
Joined:  Sat Apr 25, 2020 4:13 pm
#358581
That one plant boi wrote: Wed Jul 08, 2020 4:56 pmI have my purpur's growing in full sun with my other sarrs in central Florida and while my taller sarrs are doing fine, my purps look kind of ratty.

So I was wondering if I should move them to an area with a bit more shade in order to protect them from the heat?
S. purpurea are short plants, and they are often partially shaded by taller plants around them. Try giving them sun from dawn until 2 o'clock, then dappled sun or bright, indirect light for the rest of the afternoon. That should perk them up.
By steve booth
Posts:  790
Joined:  Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:15 am
#358603
I am in the Uk so don't get the sun intensity as some, but mine flourish in full sun with good colour. I've not heard of reducing the light levels for this particular species.

Cheers
Steve
By TrooperKris2
Posts:  7
Joined:  Thu Apr 10, 2014 6:05 am
#358867
Apparently Sarracenia Flava grow naturally in the southern states, closer to the equator. I’d bank on those being the most heat resistant, but I can’t really speak from experience.
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