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By MrGrinii
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Joined:  Mon Nov 28, 2022 8:32 pm
#424866
Hello, starting my adventure with venus flytrap seeds bought from Canada ebay store, hopefully they are not tomatos.

I did some research and so I have perlite and sphagnum moss there is also silica sand mines in Hamahtesh Hagadol crater nearby (100km~) so perhaps it is possible to fill pockets of it for a whole flytrap garden.

Still have some questions about dormancy period, do I water the plant during it or just leave it be on a sunny area preferably outdoor. Not sure if my climate is sufficient for dormancy as well since there are big temperature changes . Maybe I'll buy a lamp put them somewhere cold indoor for better stability.

Also can I grow seeds in 1 big pot 9-12inch depth or in a lot of small ones 4-6 inch. Which variant would be optimal for growth?

Also there are self watering pots on aliexpress and amazon which supposed to keep the soil always moist are they good for flytraps?

Can I start growing them right now or they wont grow because of winter? Whats the optimal refrigerator temperature if I wish to preserve them?

If I want to grow them outdoor , is it possible without a pot? Or there would be no way to keep it with enough moist?

Also adding some soil types I got nearby which I dont have any idea what it is, and if it can be used for some carnivorous plants. Would like to have some opinions while I am collecting information myself as well.
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By evenwind
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Joined:  Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:16 pm
#424868
Welcome! I'm not going to try to answer your questions because I'm not a VFT guy. But before some of the experts chime in, have you read this? http://www.flytrapcare.com/phpBB3/begin ... 11581.html
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By Intheswamp
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#424876
Definitely read the guide that evenwind linked to. As for the three types of soil....I have no idea what that is. Basically, use only live or dried sphagnum moss, peat moss, or coconut coir that is rinsed at couple of dozen times. Make sure none of this has added fertilizers or minerals. For drainage use perlite or coarse SILICA sand...if the sand isn't pure silica sand it can leach minerals into growing medium. I rinse everything a couple of times....many people don't rinse and plants grow well for them...I'm OCD. :mrgreen:

Next thing... Check out the seedbank (you can find it in the forum listings or in the banner at the top of the page (at least on my computer it's at the top). At the top of the message list in the Seed Bank forum is a sticky entitled "FLYTRAPCARE COMMUNITY SEEDBANK INVENTORY AND HOW TO REQUEST" where you'll find instructions and a list of seeds that you can request. You're presently qualified to request at "Level 0" which is made up of mostly sundew (drosera) seeds. Normally you can request one regular seed type and a "bonus". This month (November) there is an extra bonus where you can request two regular seed types *and* one of the stated bonuses. Check it out. Sundews (Drosera) are cool. D. capensis is kind of a standard sundew and is a good "beginner" plant that even experienced growers like to have around. It grows well, doesn't go dormant, and is one of the plants that can actually curl a leaf around a bug. Another good one is a filiformis.filiformis...these are thread leaf sundews that have long grass-like leaves (some people refer to the threadleafs as "snotgrass"<grin>...sticky most all of their length. For the regular bonus you can order the "mixed rosettes". These would give you three different types of sundews. I started out with flytraps but have veered over into the sundew camp. I've still got some flytraps (I'm a newbie, first year) and will keep some all the time. But, sundews seem to be what I'm interested in...real bug getters.

Lastly, welcome to the forum!!! :D
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By MrGrinii
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Joined:  Mon Nov 28, 2022 8:32 pm
#424893
evenwind wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 10:00 pm Welcome! I'm not going to try to answer your questions because I'm not a VFT guy. But before some of the experts chime in, have you read this? http://www.flytrapcare.com/phpBB3/begin ... 11581.html
Thank you! This have added more information to what I have already gathered and corrected me over some matters. Currently going through "The savage garden" book for growing carnivorous plants as well.
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By evenwind
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#424895
Since the VFT folks haven't answered you yet, maybe re-post your questions in the "Venus Fly Trap Care Questions" sub-forum where more people will see them.
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By MrGrinii
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#424896
Intheswamp wrote: Tue Nov 29, 2022 1:15 am Definitely read the guide that evenwind linked to. As for the three types of soil....I have no idea what that is. Basically, use only live or dried sphagnum moss, peat moss, or coconut coir that is rinsed at couple of dozen times. Make sure none of this has added fertilizers or minerals.
As I was told the sand soil doesnt contain much minerals over my place but I am going to give some for a lab test to see whats in there, anyway as for the purified water I ordered simple tds meter and planning to use the water from a filltered cooling system water which is gathered from air.
Another thing about soil I've seen a suggestion about sterilization of the soil using pressure cooker, is it a common practice? Or rather something only individuals do?
check it out. Sundews (Drosera) are cool. D. capensis is kind of a standard sundew and is a good "beginner" plant that even experienced growers like to have around. It grows well, doesn't go dormant, and is one of the plants that can actually curl a leaf around a bug.
I'll definitely check it out! I want to try grow sundews as well.
For the regular bonus you can order the "mixed rosettes". These would give you three different types of sundews. I started out with flytraps but have veered over into the sundew camp. I've still got some flytraps (I'm a newbie, first year) and will keep some all the time. But, sundews seem to be what I'm interested in...real bug getters.
I am interested in sundews too, they are very unique and their catching method is different from venus flytrap, I have animal farms near me so any carnivorous plant I grow will have plenty of food if I open my couple windows.
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By MrGrinii
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Joined:  Mon Nov 28, 2022 8:32 pm
#424897
evenwind wrote: Tue Nov 29, 2022 8:33 pm Since the VFT folks haven't answered you yet, maybe re-post your questions in the "Venus Fly Trap Care Questions" sub-forum where more people will see them.
Understood, I'll read more information and repost it with some new questions.
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By Intheswamp
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#424906
MrGrinii wrote: Tue Nov 29, 2022 8:36 pm
Intheswamp wrote: Tue Nov 29, 2022 1:15 am Definitely read the guide that evenwind linked to. As for the three types of soil....I have no idea what that is. Basically, use only live or dried sphagnum moss, peat moss, or coconut coir that is rinsed at couple of dozen times. Make sure none of this has added fertilizers or minerals.
As I was told the sand soil doesnt contain much minerals over my place but I am going to give some for a lab test to see whats in there, anyway as for the purified water I ordered simple tds meter and planning to use the water from a filltered cooling system water which is gathered from air.
Another thing about soil I've seen a suggestion about sterilization of the soil using pressure cooker, is it a common practice? Or rather something only individuals do?
check it out. Sundews (Drosera) are cool. D. capensis is kind of a standard sundew and is a good "beginner" plant that even experienced growers like to have around. It grows well, doesn't go dormant, and is one of the plants that can actually curl a leaf around a bug.
I'll definitely check it out! I want to try grow sundews as well.
For the regular bonus you can order the "mixed rosettes". These would give you three different types of sundews. I started out with flytraps but have veered over into the sundew camp. I've still got some flytraps (I'm a newbie, first year) and will keep some all the time. But, sundews seem to be what I'm interested in...real bug getters.
I am interested in sundews too, they are very unique and their catching method is different from venus flytrap, I have animal farms near me so any carnivorous plant I grow will have plenty of food if I open my couple windows.
You really don't want *any* minerals in your sand. Pure 100% silica sand. What you might do is fill a jar half full of your sand and finish filling it with water. Check the TDS level of the sand/water to establish a baseline. Let it sit for a few weeks to see what might leech out of the sand into the water. Check it once in a while with your TDS meter to see if ppm starts increasing. Don't be in a hurry about dumping it out. If, in a few weeks you feel comfortable that the TDS level is not increasing put the jar on a back shelf and come back to it in a month or two, then three or four more months, then a year. Just a thought. ;)

Condensate from an air conditioning unit can be used. It should have a very low TDS reading. Some people have raised concerns of copper with the units, though. I'm not sure what to make of that. It seems that dehumidifier water gets a better passing grade than condensate from air-conditioners. FWIW. :)

Most people will say that if you have good quality grow mix ingredients that sterilization isn't needed...lots of people don't even rinse their peat moss or perlite before using it...and they do well. I'm a tad OCD about things, though. I always rinse my media...especially my peat moss. If I'm going to be planting seeds I will either microwave (I have an old microwave we don't use for food) the moist peat moss or in a pinch simply use some boiling water poured over it. It is supposed to help to cut down on algae and mold gross. I'm feeling more comfortable with going through the trouble of rinsing my perlite, too...and it can be a pain. Sand, too, needs rinsing well...even silica sand. Oh, and if you're using sand you want a coarse grade...something around a #12 (I think)...sand in roughly a 2mm to 4mm size.

Sundews are cool. There's several types and several species within those types.

The bottom line is to have fun and don't stress out over the hobby (but all of us do at times to a degree! :lol: ). You're at the right place here on the forum...lots of good folks with years of experience that are willing to help newbies (like me! :D ).
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By evenwind
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Joined:  Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:16 pm
#424914
A fast way of checking to see if your sand is suitable is to put a tablespoon or so in a shallow container and cover it with vinegar. If it bubbles you shouldn't use the sand.
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By MrGrinii
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#424991
@intheswamp
It seems that dehumidifier water gets a better passing grade than condensate from air-conditioners. FWIW. :)
I can believe in that however I want to see what would I get after running the air conditioner condensate through a couple of filters and if such filters add anything "new" into the water. But... that's after I get the TDS meter.
I always rinse my media...especially my peat moss.
Thank you for the microwave idea, just to point out the details, how much time, what mode, and what volume of moss you are rinsing? And how many watts do your microwave have? Would be nice to have that information if possible, thanks in advance! I have both an old microwave and pressure cooker sitting in the storage which I don't need, they might find a new life helping some carnivorous plants to start their own.
Oh, and if you're using sand you want a coarse grade...something around a #12 (I think)...sand in roughly a 2mm to 4mm size.
Alright, that is going to help if I do manage to order some silica sand (I only found an industry company so I'd probably have to negotiate for price/amount) as for perlite however its relatively cheap and so far the easiest to get (100L for ~25$)
Sundews are cool. There are several types and several species within those types.
I did check them up and without dormancy period they really make it easier for my hot climate.
The bottom line is to have fun and don't stress out over the hobby (but all of us do at times to a degree! :lol: ). You're at the right place here on the forum...lots of good folks with years of experience that are willing to help newbies (like me! :D ).
Sometimes a hobby can be stressful that's true:) tournaments for example, feels great that I can rely on someone with experience instead of being a pioneer through trial and error.

@evenwind
A fast way of checking to see if your sand is suitable is to put a tablespoon or so in a shallow container and cover it with vinegar. If it bubbles you shouldn't use the sand.
I'll have to check it out, so the idea is that the bubbles should arrive if the sand contains calcium carbonate from different minerals as vinegar dissolves it. Thank you, I'll try and post the results.
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By Intheswamp
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#424999
From what I've read (no personal experience) is that condensate from many air conditioning units tend to have elevated levels of copper in it, whereas dehumidifiers don't. Why there would be a difference, I have no idea. Test it with your TDS meter...you may not need to run it through any filters. I've tested the TDS in the water from our dehumidifier and (if I recall correctly) it was around 15ppm. Definitely investigate it, as it can be a good source of water in an arid area. ;)

I'll have to check the microwave. It is an *older* model...one of the microwave/convection oven ones...rather large, most likely 1500W or higher(?). What I did was after rinsing and the peat moss was still moist (not wet) I put it in a large plastic container that fit inside the oven. I "cooked" it on high. I had a probe thermometer that I used to check the temperature all along as it heated up, stirring it a little bit each time I checked it. What I've read from other people is to get the temperature up to 180F. When checking the temperature I would stick the probe in it at multiple places to be sure it was thoroughly heating. Be careful as the peat moss will be HOT and will stay hot for a while. Having said all of that there are thoughts *against* sterilizing because wild things (molds, mildews, micro-plants, whatever) could land on the sterilized medium but there would be no native organisms there to fight back the foreign invaders. I used some boiling water on my last batch that I did only because I'll be planting seeds in it and I used rainwater to rinse with...and the rainwater could have its own load of spores and micro-seeds in it. If I had been using distilled, RO, or maybe even dehumidifier water I probably wouldn't have used the boiling water for the final rinse. Also, heating in a microwave or using boiling water will cause the peat moss to break down more quickly and need replacing sooner. Sterilizing has pros and cons to it. Here's a few threads on sterilizing:
sterilizing-soil-t53213-30.html
sterilizing-peat-moss-perlite-with-oven-t29223.html
potting-media-sterilization-t8713.html

In your area, you will have to deal with the heat. I would think growing your sundews on the east side of your house so that they get a few hours of direct sun in the mornings and then shade the rest of the day. Naturally, if you're growing them inside you will not have as big of a problem with heat. Most of the plants like LOTS of sunlight/light...it's the heat that makes them struggle at times. Remember, some sundews need dormancy and some don't...research what you are going to be growing. ;)

evenwind gave you a good tip on using the vinegar, especially checking local "found" sands. You're area has a lot of limestone, which you don't want.

Kol tuv.
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By MrGrinii
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#425063
Sterilizing has pros and cons to it. Here are a few threads on sterilizing:
Thank you for sharing the information about sterilizing and as well for your setup and the detailed information about the tasks you usually perform! It helps a lot.
In your area, you will have to deal with the heat. I would think growing your sundews on the east side of your house so they get a few hours of direct sun in the mornings and then shade the rest of the day. Naturally, if you're growing them inside you will not have as big of a problem with heat. Most of the plants like LOTS of sunlight/light...it's the heat that makes them struggle at times. Remember, some sundews need dormancy and some don't...research what you are going to be growing. ;)
The heat worries me but fortunately, I have some partially shady areas which are exposed to the sun for a limited amount of time. As you have said I'll start with growing plants indoors but eventually, I'll be expanding into the outdoors as well. Dormancy worries me though because of sudden temperature changes. I've tried to see the history of temperature changes for my region for the previous year but it doesn't seem to be saved anywhere.
Kol tuv.
:D
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By MrGrinii
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#425064
Intheswamp wrote:Here's a thread in the forum pertaining to growing plants in the heat:
sundew-heat-t37993.html

Focus on tropical plants.
Use white pots.
White pots are harder to get but as the sun is nothing to be joking with I'll have to figure something out, maybe self-watering solutions will come in handy in my region? I'll have to test. Thanks again for sharing valuable information. Possibly Drosera Capensis could take some more sun over my place...
By Bug_cemetery
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Joined:  Tue Mar 08, 2022 11:48 pm
#425067
Capensis should be happy with all the sun that you get once they are acclimated. It sounds like tuberous drosera could do very well in your climate! Pygmy drosera would likely be quite happy too.
Filter sand for swimming pools is great for carnivorous plants because it is close to pure silica and already reasonably clean. I don’t even rinse mine anymore. That might be easier to find than horticultural sand.
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