FlytrapCare Carnivorous Plant Forums

Sponsored by FlytrapStore.com

Discuss Drosera, Byblis, and Drosophyllum plant care here

Moderator: Matt

User avatar
By StephenB200+
Posts:  58
Joined:  Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:01 pm
#390945
My Drosera Frazier islands and Tokaiensis all made numerous flower scapes. Very few of the flowers acutely opened. Most are staying in a closed cone shape. Any input on when to collect seeds? Most of the scapes are rather tall and grow beyond the pot’s width, so any seeds that fall will likely disappear onto the shelf.
User avatar
By Sarracenia2004
Posts:  159
Joined:  Fri Oct 15, 2021 3:31 am
#390951
Maybe bag up the flowers to prevent the seeds from going everywhere?
User avatar
By MaxVft
Location: 
Posts:  1028
Joined:  Sat May 08, 2021 4:17 am
#390954
This website has a great guide when you wanna collect seeds:
http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/dros ... sting.html

One note: Don't harvest the seed pods early, not even when they are somewhat black, if you do you will get tiny immature green seeds. Wait until the pods are completely dried up and will drop seeds by just a slight sway of the flower stalk. This can take 4+ months (which is what it took for my intermedia to ripen), so be patient :)
StephenB200+ liked this
User avatar
By StephenB200+
Posts:  58
Joined:  Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:01 pm
#390970
Sarracenia2004 wrote: Sat Oct 23, 2021 3:13 pm Maybe bag up the flowers to prevent the seeds from going everywhere?
A drop cloth. Good idea, better than landing on the shelf!
User avatar
By StephenB200+
Posts:  58
Joined:  Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:01 pm
#390971
MaxVft wrote: Sat Oct 23, 2021 4:16 pm This website has a great guide when you wanna collect seeds:
http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/dros ... sting.html

One note: Don't harvest the seed pods early, not even when they are somewhat black, if you do you will get tiny immature green seeds. Wait until the pods are completely dried up and will drop seeds by just a slight sway of the flower stalk. This can take 4+ months (which is what it took for my intermedia to ripen), so be patient :)
Thanks! Patience is my middle name 😜
User avatar
By evenwind
Location: 
Posts:  1427
Joined:  Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:16 pm
#390973
I use a different technique to harvest Drosera seeds. I didn't come up with this on my own, but I can't remember who it was who taught it to me (Was it you, Mike?). Whoever you are: Thank you!

I take a large-ish square of paper (maybe 8") and fold it in half with a sharp crease. I let the fold flatten out and hold it with my left hand near the base of the plant. With my right hand, I gently bend the flower stalk over the paper so that the seed pods are an inch or two to one side of the crease. I then use a gentle slapping motion to hit the whole seed head against the paper. Ripe seeds will drop out of the pods and roll down to the crease. When no more seeds are appearing after multiple slaps (or I get bored), I slowly release the stalk and tip the collected seeds into a collection envelope, clean the paper by brushing my finger tip along the crease and move on to the next plant.
This technique has several advantages:
- You can start collecting seeds from the earliest ripening heads without worrying about immature seeds further up the shaft. Since the shaft is still attached to the plant, the other heads will still have a chance to mature in their own time.
- The collected seeds are clean, with almost no chaff to be removed.
- It's quick.
- You can repeat the process as often as you like, gathering only the ripe seeds each time - just as long as you are very gentle with the sometimes brittle flower shaft. (If I do snap the shaft, I just put whatever's left of the seed head on the folded paper and thresh out the remaining ripe seeds with a plastic spoon or the equivalent. Or I could follow the recommendations for maturing seed pods elsewhere in this discussion.)

One other note: For plants with very short shafts, I use a much smaller piece of paper (4"?) and hold it so the crease has a gentle pocket near the middle. I find to get close enough to the base of the shaft, I have to tip the paper, so that the pocket allows the seeds to be trapped and not roll off. I'm also much more careful about bending the shaft since the short shaft is likely to be less flexible. Otherwise the procedure is the same.
Attachments:
thresh.jpg
thresh.jpg (57.44 KiB) Viewed 636 times
User avatar
By StephenB200+
Posts:  58
Joined:  Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:01 pm
#391051
Thanks for the tip. I’ll give that a spin when the flower pods are dried out.
evenwind wrote: Sat Oct 23, 2021 8:26 pm I use a different technique to harvest Drosera seeds. I didn't come up with this on my own, but I can't remember who it was who taught it to me (Was it you, Mike?). Whoever you are: Thank you!

I take a large-ish square of paper (maybe 8") and fold it in half with a sharp crease. I let the fold flatten out and hold it with my left hand near the base of the plant. With my right hand, I gently bend the flower stalk over the paper so that the seed pods are an inch or two to one side of the crease. I then use a gentle slapping motion to hit the whole seed head against the paper. Ripe seeds will drop out of the pods and roll down to the crease. When no more seeds are appearing after multiple slaps (or I get bored), I slowly release the stalk and tip the collected seeds into a collection envelope, clean the paper by brushing my finger tip along the crease and move on to the next plant.
This technique has several advantages:
- You can start collecting seeds from the earliest ripening heads without worrying about immature seeds further up the shaft. Since the shaft is still attached to the plant, the other heads will still have a chance to mature in their own time.
- The collected seeds are clean, with almost no chaff to be removed.
- It's quick.
- You can repeat the process as often as you like, gathering only the ripe seeds each time - just as long as you are very gentle with the sometimes brittle flower shaft. (If I do snap the shaft, I just put whatever's left of the seed head on the folded paper and thresh out the remaining ripe seeds with a plastic spoon or the equivalent. Or I could follow the recommendations for maturing seed pods elsewhere in this discussion.)

One other note: For plants with very short shafts, I use a much smaller piece of paper (4"?) and hold it so the crease has a gentle pocket near the middle. I find to get close enough to the base of the shaft, I have to tip the paper, so that the pocket allows the seeds to be trapped and not roll off. I'm also much more careful about bending the shaft since the short shaft is likely to be less flexible. Otherwise the procedure is the same.

Welcome to the forums! What you are seeing here is[…]

I would wait till after last frost. I do plan on s[…]

It'll be fine to continue it's dormancy. And speak[…]

Cute seedlings -are they D paradoxa?

Off course they do. ;) Just take out that can o[…]

SASE Arrived today. Thanks Dean !

Drosera prolifera

Mine certainly does not get highland conditions. H[…]

SASE received. Order is fulfilled. Return envelope[…]

SASE received. Order is fulfilled. Return envelope[…]

Support the community - Shop at FlytrapStore.com!