FlytrapCare Carnivorous Plant Forums

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Discuss fertilization techniques here. For advanced growers only!

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By Z_Y
Posts:  76
Joined:  Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:19 pm
#369946
So I've heard Azoxystrobin mentioned before as being beneficial to plants. Anyone have any strong opinions on using this?

What about interactions with something like Trichoderma atroviride? I'm assuming Azoxystrobin would straight up kill the trichoderma? Perhaps because of this, it may actually harm certain plants that form symbiotic relationships with Trichoderma?

And on that note, which cps do form symbiotic relationships with trichoderma? I think most people dose their Helis and Cephs with trichoderma, I haven't really heard much use on Neps or Vfts.
By jose
Posts:  150
Joined:  Fri Oct 09, 2020 8:18 pm
#369957
Trich doesn’t do anything for Neps. Negative reaction with Drosera. Flytraps are vigorous enough there’s no reason to try to boost their immune system with trich. Trichoderma doesn’t speed growth or anything like that it just helps reduce plant stress by attacking other fungi
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By Nepenthes0260
Posts:  1044
Joined:  Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:59 am
#369960
I’ve seen positive results with Trichoderma on my Heliamphora and Cephalotus and know many other growers who use it on their helis and cephs as well. Trichoderma is a fungus that can be used as a biofungicide, attacking other harmful fungi so letting the plant grow better.
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By Apollyon
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Posts:  1075
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#369968
I'm going to follow this thread too. I think I'm also getting to the point where I want to push things to the next level.

That said, I've used Azoxystrobin. Began by dosing my VFTs (I'm sure we've all seen that video at one time or another with Scott's Disease EX) and then started messing with my Drosera. I used it mainly on Capensis seedlings and my D. Regia. What I did notice is the interaction turned both plants a much brighter green. D.Regia in particular. The growth point no longer had that bronze-ish color to it (pardon my lack of botanical terms), the entire thing was different shades of green. The leaves did indeed last longer than they did prior to treatment and I feel as though they maintained more dew in my conditions (open air, relative humidity, temps 79/70). It'd maintain dew on approx 6-7 pre treatment with about 10-11 leaves; post-treatment there was dew on at least 10-11 with well over 15 live leaves. These weren't mature plants though. The bainskloof capensis also changed and lost the pigmentation they had before. Over time, the plants returned to normal. I actually dose the regia every couple months or so now because I liked the response it got. I don't think it personally has them grow "better" though I can understand the theory behind it. I think it is nice for increasing the longevity of the leaves though. Maybe next time I'll try to document it or something. My Regia have returned to normal so it'd be a good time to try it out.

I never tried it on cephalotus because I'm one of those who appreciates the color they get under intense light. I believe dosing them would affect the coloring of the pitchers but I doubt it would harm the plant. I used it on some pinguiculas too but didn't have any real noticeable effects.
By Z_Y
Posts:  76
Joined:  Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:19 pm
#369972
I guess there really needs to be some controlled experiments. Also, it's still a bit unclear which cps actually form mycorrhiza relationships. It really could be that Azoxystrobin might disrupt an existing fungal ecology, allowing more harmful pathogens to re-colonize afterwards?
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By Apollyon
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Posts:  1075
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#369973
I agree, I feel it would take several plants (clones I feel would be a better gauge from same DNA) being introduced to several different types of mycorrhiza to see if there is any kind of benefit to them. Then test among a host of conditions to try to isolate the variable and see if the fungi is actually the cause. There are so many types, even if the brand mixtures like Mykos/Azos etc. worked, you'd have to further isolate them :/ Apparently those don't have Trichoderma though.

I would guess something like that as well. Azoxystrobin would probably kill off all the fungi leaving a "vacuum" where something harmful could be introduced. Plant medium tends to naturally grow the fungi (outdoors anyway). I never thought too much about it with carnivorous plants. However, with "normal" plants that is part of why they recommend keeping some of the original soil(depends on who you ask. In bonsai that's more common) so the colony can rebuild itself and provide a more hospitable environment for the plant. I saw a lot of it on some tree species of mine. Bare-rooting tends to knock the plants back in general so the additives are sometimes a helpful supplement to establish itself better.
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By Apollyon
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Posts:  1075
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#369980
murrkywaters wrote:When I get a little less squeamish about uprooting my plants ill take a look around some under the scope.

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I've honestly found CPs to be pretty tough with uprooting. Idk if it's my tree experience but I've never had an issue with plant death. They bounce back pretty quickly as well. Save it for when it becomes necessary to repot. I'd like to hear what you find though
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By Nepenthes0260
Posts:  1044
Joined:  Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:59 am
#369982
Apollyon wrote: Fri Dec 04, 2020 7:23 pm
murrkywaters wrote:When I get a little less squeamish about uprooting my plants ill take a look around some under the scope.

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I've honestly found CPs to be pretty tough with uprooting. Idk if it's my tree experience but I've never had an issue with plant death. They bounce back pretty quickly as well. Save it for when it becomes necessary to repot. I'd like to hear what you find though
I agree. It seems like helis would be terribly picky about root disturbance and such but honestly I repot them without them skipping a beat. And I don’t bag them or baby them in any way afterwards, just put them back right where they were growing. My cephs do pout a bit after dividing though. Especially if not all the divs have a good chunk of rhizome.
By tommyr
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Posts:  1575
Joined:  Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:38 am
#376288
Z_Y wrote: Fri Dec 04, 2020 9:41 am So I've heard Azoxystrobin mentioned before as being beneficial to plants. Anyone have any strong opinions on using this?
I know this is an old thread but I experimented with this last year. It did absolutely NOTHING for the plants from what I can tell. It didn't hurt the plants but it did not do what a few people claim it's supposed to do. Now I have a lifetime supply of fungicide, that's about the only good thing I can say about it. Save your money.
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By hungrycarnivores
Posts:  99
Joined:  Mon Feb 22, 2021 9:53 pm
#376300
I grow in near-aseptic conditions, I mean I even don't open the lid; don't grow moss, anything. Azoxystrobin is very good stuff. That said, the key is to dose many times, so all of the bad fungus dies. Bad fungus is less susceptible to Azoxystrobin than good fungus for some reason. Cell wall thickness I guess.
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