FlytrapCare Carnivorous Plant Forums

Sponsored by FlytrapStore.com

Discuss Drosera, Byblis, and Drosophyllum plant care here

Moderator: Matt

By Berrybob
Posts:  282
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:42 am
#359880
I was digging around in the care guides section of the forums, but I couldn't find a grow guide for tuberous drosera. I'm really want to add some to my collection and eventually try to grow them from seed. How do you grow yours? What species should I start out with?
By optimus prime
Posts:  848
Joined:  Mon Jun 22, 2020 12:26 am
#359885
I’ve never grown Tuberous sundews. I recommend a book called the savage garden it has tons of growing tips on every single carnivorous plant in the entire world. Even Tuberous sundew and it even gives you advice on what plant to start with
Berrybob liked this
By Ben Goudge
Location: 
Posts:  284
Joined:  Fri Apr 24, 2020 3:38 pm
#360146
There are some tuberous Drosera seeds in the FTCF seed bank.
By Berrybob
Posts:  282
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:42 am
#360346
Ben Goudge wrote: Wed Jul 29, 2020 8:54 pm There are some tuberous Drosera seeds in the FTCF seed bank.
Yeah that's why I started this thread. I wanted to learn about them more before trying to grow them.
User avatar
By DeadlyCarnivore
Posts:  263
Joined:  Sun Oct 23, 2016 6:17 am
#362651
Tuberous Drosera can be very difficult to grow from seed. Most of them need stratification (heat stratification, if I remember correctly) and it can take years for them to sprout. D. Auriculata and a couple of others do not need stratification and would be the easiest to grow from seed.

I tried growing D. Auriculata from seed a couple of years ago and was able to get them to sprout and it took around 21 days for them to germinate. I have a horrible memory but I think I had around 10 seeds and 7 or 8 of them germinated. All I did was wet a paper towel, put it in a petri dish, sprinkled the seeds out on the paper towel and covered it up with the lid. I kept it very wet and under a lamp that did the trick for me. Once they sprouted I very carefully moved them to a mix of 2:1 sand and peat moss. They all died though, I was still very new to all of this carnivorous plant stuff when I did it and it was too late into winter for them. Its all trial and error, if you can get them to sprout and keep them fed while they are so tiny, they should make it through their first winter and summer.

At the beginning of this past winter I purchased 2 Tuberous Drosera. Squamosa x Collina, and Ramellosa "White Flower". They did pretty well. Both survived and created tubers, I keep the room they are in at 60-65 degrees Fahrenheit and give them about 12 hours of light. When they went dormant I dug them out of their pots and put them in a bag with some moist media and kept them in a darker place. Theyre in the same room they were growing in and have managed to stay dormant throughout the summer. I have been checking on them every once in a while to make sure they aren't rotting or drying out, and to check to see if they are coming out of dormancy. Tuberous drosera like sand, So you want a mixture of about 2:1 sand and peat Or 3:1 sand and peat.

Whew, sorry this is a long reply. I don't know which tuberous drosera would be easiest to start out with. The Squamosa x Collina I have is supposed to be easy to grow (If I can do it, I think you definitely could, I am not a pro at any of this, haha). I read somewhere that D. Indumenta is also really easy to grow. If you can find D. Auriculata, that one would be good to start with also. Someone correct me if I am wrong but I think a lot of them are easy to grow. I think the only obstacle is finding them as plants/tubers. If you are going to try seeds you should start ASAP so they can get big enough before summer. I am not sure if people who grow them from seed keep them from going dormant their first summer, so you would have to ask around for that. Hope this helped!

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

Berrybob liked this
By Berrybob
Posts:  282
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:42 am
#362658
DeadlyCarnivore wrote: Wed Aug 12, 2020 11:42 pm Tuberous Drosera can be very difficult to grow from seed. Most of them need stratification (heat stratification, if I remember correctly) and it can take years for them to sprout. D. Auriculata and a couple of others do not need stratification and would be the easiest to grow from seed.

I tried growing D. Auriculata from seed a couple of years ago and was able to get them to sprout and it took around 21 days for them to germinate. I have a horrible memory but I think I had around 10 seeds and 7 or 8 of them germinated. All I did was wet a paper towel, put it in a petri dish, sprinkled the seeds out on the paper towel and covered it up with the lid. I kept it very wet and under a lamp that did the trick for me. Once they sprouted I very carefully moved them to a mix of 2:1 sand and peat moss. They all died though, I was still very new to all of this carnivorous plant stuff when I did it and it was too late into winter for them. Its all trial and error, if you can get them to sprout and keep them fed while they are so tiny, they should make it through their first winter and summer.

At the beginning of this past winter I purchased 2 Tuberous Drosera. Squamosa x Collina, and Ramellosa "White Flower". They did pretty well. Both survived and created tubers, I keep the room they are in at 60-65 degrees Fahrenheit and give them about 12 hours of light. When they went dormant I dug them out of their pots and put them in a bag with some moist media and kept them in a darker place. Theyre in the same room they were growing in and have managed to stay dormant throughout the summer. I have been checking on them every once in a while to make sure they aren't rotting or drying out, and to check to see if they are coming out of dormancy. Tuberous drosera like sand, So you want a mixture of about 2:1 sand and peat Or 3:1 sand and peat.

Whew, sorry this is a long reply. I don't know which tuberous drosera would be easiest to start out with. The Squamosa x Collina I have is supposed to be easy to grow (If I can do it, I think you definitely could, I am not a pro at any of this, haha). I read somewhere that D. Indumenta is also really easy to grow. If you can find D. Auriculata, that one would be good to start with also. Someone correct me if I am wrong but I think a lot of them are easy to grow. I think the only obstacle is finding them as plants/tubers. If you are going to try seeds you should start ASAP so they can get big enough before summer. I am not sure if people who grow them from seed keep them from going dormant their first summer, so you would have to ask around for that. Hope this helped!

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Thanks for the great answer. I plan on requesting some auriculata seeds this month. Is it better to germinate on media or is the wet paper towel method? I guess its a good thing that I bought a bag of sand.
By Apollyon
Location: 
Posts:  406
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#362660
I'm actually having some Auriculata sent to me currently. If you're looking to try them from seed you need to plant them soon or they will not have enough time to go through their process before it warms up again. You want to sow them before the fall.

I have a tuberous sundew tuber I purchased from ebay but I'm on the fence on whether it'll sprout or not. I check on it and keep it on my rack but I had some issues with it when I planted it. Also I put a bag over it instead of keeping the soil damp and closing it off. I sprinkle a little water on top every week or two very lightly. Time will tell.

I do want to get these going though. Even now, so little is known about how to grow them well. They are a challenge and worth trying out.
Berrybob liked this
User avatar
By DeadlyCarnivore
Posts:  263
Joined:  Sun Oct 23, 2016 6:17 am
#362839
Sorry for the late reply, You can germinate on media if you want to. I did it on a wet paper towel because the seeds are tiny and black, so they were easier to see and it was super easy to tell if they had sprouted or not. You should plant them ASAP once you get them.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

Berrybob liked this
By Berrybob
Posts:  282
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:42 am
#365278
I got some d. Auriculata from the seed bank and planted them last week. Ill update this thread if I get germination. Should I bag them or are they fine without being bagged?
By Apollyon
Location: 
Posts:  406
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#365294
Berrybob wrote:I got some d. Auriculata from the seed bank and planted them last week. Ill update this thread if I get germination. Should I bag them or are they fine without being bagged?
From the research I gathered, tuberous aren' particularly fond of high humidity environments. I personally haven't bagged my seeds. I have them in the trays now to simulate the start of the "wet season." Info on tuberous sundews is conflicting so I tried to just pull some of the consistent stuff. If you have more than one pot, try one with and one without.
By Berrybob
Posts:  282
Joined:  Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:42 am
#365295
I only have one pot of them. I'll try without the bag this time, thanks for the advice.
By Apollyon
Location: 
Posts:  406
Joined:  Tue May 05, 2020 2:49 am
#366281
Congrats dude, I haven't had that kind of luck yet. Still too hot right now I think.

@Panman, Did you receive my PM? Sometimes I wonde[…]

What's your water solution?

Hi, Evenwind's solutions deserves your attention.[…]

In the wild, Sarracenia minor's range just reaches[…]

venomous insect

my nep is still developing its pitcher since[…]

Photo Contest

Yeah that burgundy black is very nice.

Gotcha. And, as per our PM convos, I'll forego the[…]

Order received. Your order number is 0175. I'll PM[…]

Dividing Nepenthes?

I just pulled two basals off of my ventricosa. The[…]

Support the community - Shop at FlytrapStore.com!