What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

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Bob Beer

 
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What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by Bob Beer » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:14 am

Heh maybe in Europe! Unfortunately I have never seen a Ping in a garden center here, only flytraps, Sarracenias and an occasional N ‘ventrata.’ But those are indeed good pings to start with.


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Last edited by Bob Beer on Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Bob Beer

 
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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by Bob Beer » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:24 am

DeathMob wrote:
Btw for most pings, the soil to use would be peat and sphagnum, or just sphagnum or peat depending on the species?


For temperate and warm temperate pings, a peat sand mixture or sphagnum would be good. For Mexican pings most people use no more than 25% peat if any. I use a combination of Arcillite/Zeolite clay
Gravel (sold as “Aquatic Plant Media” - evidently people refuse to understand that “media” is a plural of “medium” but I digress), mixed with silica sand, fine pumice, sometimes just a bit of peat, and a very small bit of chelated iron, which supposedly increases color in some species. (I am not convinced.) I also tried adding limestone (aragonite) sand, and have planted in pure aragonite. Basically things do well as long as they stay moist and they have good air circulation. However one friend said that his P. gigantea took off after he started adding limestone gravel to his mix. Was it because of the lima, or greater aeration due to the coarseness of the mix? I don’t know. Others have said that adding lime has a little effect. Still, many of the Mexican species we grow, are naturally found on limestone cliffs, so it stands to reason that at least some of them might benefit. Unfortunately I don’t have the vast amount of space to do the appropriate comparisons!


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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by jeff » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:47 am

I'm surprised you tell me that you do not find hybrid ping in gardening in USA

For temperate and warm temperate pings, a peat sand mixture or sphagnum would be good.

not on all, the majority like the mexican are from limestone backgrounds, I cultivate a multitude ;) .

at home most temperate and mexican are in mineral backgrounds except a few like moranensis and others, the subtropical US in peat/river sand 30/70.

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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by Bob Beer » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:13 am

Mexican pings are not temperate or warm temperate.
By “warm temperate” I’m referring to ones like primuliflora, ionantha etc.


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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by jeff » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:52 am

Mexican pings are not temperate or warm temperate

I know ,I cultivate ping (ALL) since 1989 ;) .

the majority of the temperate (except for a few) ,here ,are like the mexican ,from limestone backgrounds, I cultivate a multitude ,see my grow list ;)
for me "warm temperate"in USA are the subtropicale US : ionantha, primuliflora,caerulea,lutea, planifolia , pumila .

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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by DeathMob » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:42 pm

jeff wrote:Bonjour

why not try temperate style P.vulgaris (allways outside), or subtropical US as P.caerulea.

for the mexican I always advise to start with hybrids of the style x'Sethos ', X' Weser ', X' Tina ' very easy to find in garden centers.They are easy enough plants that are ideal for hand-making ,which does not claim special conditions since they are horticultural hybrids.

the problem with watering in dormant period ('in situ' the dry period) is the rotting, so a slightly moist substrate may be a good solution with always good air humidity, especially when the substrate is not completely mineral, as most horticultural hybrids.

avoid dry atmospheres of overheated rooms.

for my part I always go out all my mexican ping from May to October and I return them from October to May in a bright room with a temperature of 10-12 ° C on average, especially no temperature below 5 ° C,dry or slightly wet substrate for the majority and completely dry for all ping with 'hibernacle' and onion.


Awesome!!! Thank you for the information!
~Jake~

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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by Benurmanii » Sun Feb 03, 2019 12:59 am

Bob Beer wrote:Mexican pings are not temperate or warm temperate.
By “warm temperate” I’m referring to ones like primuliflora, ionantha etc.


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I think Jeff meant that the cold temperate Pinguicula are often found growing in limestone rock. Although, I have a lot of species that naturally grow in limestone, but never really found any noticeable difference when growing them in acidic soils. Although, it is certainly easier to prepare a vermiculite/agricultural lime mix than a peat mix.

At the same time, I’ve never done an actual side-by-side comparison of a clone of the same species of the same size. Perhaps I’ll do that this year.

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Re: What is a good Butterwort for beginners?

by jeff » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:55 am

Bonjour
in fact for temperate (northern and southern hemisphere)3 major types of substrate:
- limestone
- acid (peat)
- undifferentiated

see my web site here to "habitats" in french desolate :
http://fern72.free.fr/siteweb/habitat/habitat.html#

for me a plant that grows in a substrate of PH: 7-8 to difficulties to grow in a PH: 4-5 on the other hand the opposite can very well work

Moreover in ecology often the plants are of good marker as for the nature of the sub soil,often plants found in calcareous environments are not the same found in acidic environments, of course as there are always exceptions ;)

jeff

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