Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

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Leathal_Traps

 
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Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by Leathal_Traps » Sun Jun 23, 2013 3:40 am

Okay, for those people out there who have either drosera burmannii, or drosera glanduligera, or both, which one do you think is better.
By "better" I mean, better germination rate, seed production, maximum age, and nice shape/leaf structure, etc? So, what do you think?

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by fattytuna » Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:19 am

Drosera burmanii is apparently much easier to grow. I grow this plant and in my opinion, D. burmannii is better in all aspects listed above. It is an annual in the wild, but if you cut off the flower stalks, or feed it more, they recover after flowering (just don't let it flower too much). They are extremely weedy if let flower.

While i don't grow D. glanduligera, i have heard that they are harder to grow and maintain. The only thing is that they have amazingly fast tentacle movement (less than a second). Some D. burmannii plants noticeably fast too (However, mine never did)

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by coline » Sun Jun 23, 2013 7:21 am

Yes, I second that opinion, D. burmanii is a really easy plant, just as any capensis or spatulata, the thing is, that normally, it would behave as an anual, but the seeds will sprout everywhere, and still it is really fast:
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWnU8UKsjfE[/youtube]

D. glanduligera is a cold requiring plant, so it is more difficult and may only be grown in winters or so, I think, since I have not had it, that with a good feeding it could be very easy, given the cold temperatures for it, but not as easy as burmanii that may live anywhere.
also you may choose between green, green with red and red burmaniis, if you wanted variety.

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by Leathal_Traps » Sun Jun 23, 2013 11:10 am

Cool, thanks a lot! Right now I am germinating drosera burmannii seeds, and a few have sprouted!
I will do my best to keep them alive, thanks for your opinions too!

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by bananaman » Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:47 am

Just so you know, the seedlings are unlikely to survive unless you feed them while they are still small.
I tested it with some of my plants, and those that were not fed died.

Once they were started, though, they were as easy as any D. capensis.

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by Leathal_Traps » Sun Jun 30, 2013 2:08 pm

Yeah thanks! They are soooooooo small thought. As soon as the first carnivorous leaf popped up i fed it with a crushed fish pellet, took me some time tho.

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Re: Drosera Glanduligera V.s. Drosera Burmannii

by Starchy » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:17 pm

I recently grew D. burmannii from seed to flowering (Jan-May, that's how fast). I documented most of the benchmark moments in this forum. Feel free to use it as a reference: d-burmannii-t18211.html

and here is a thread consisting of a couple major set-backs: burmanii-looking-sickly-t19734.html

Hope it helps, and good luck. It is very hard to over-feed these guys. Best thing I can tell you is to get a fruit fly culture and feed it like crazy. Once the leaves are a bit better, start searching your basement for daddy-long-legs spiders (or other "top of the food chain" insects) because fruit flies won't be enough (unless you drop about 5 on each open leaf when it starts flowering)!

Regarding the thread title, I definitely think D. glanduligera are much cooler (they have the fastest snap tentacles of all Drosera - as fast as VFT snap traps), but D. burmannii (and D. sessilifolia for that matter) are much more realistic. All 3 are not meant to be perennials, but D. burmannii and D. sessilifolia can be if you really take care of them. They aren't as fast as D. glanduligera, but they are still really cool plants. Here's a thread I started showing my burmannii eating a spider (I didn't trigger the snap tentacles, just placed the spider right on the leaf. But the regular dewy tentacles are still pretty quick): burmannii-eating-spider-t20169.html


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