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Discuss any carnivorous plant that doesn't fit in the above categories here or general chat about carnivorous plants

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By DRBeck
Posts:  11
Joined:  Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:15 am
#287377
I'll have some wine and chill.

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By Smooter80
Posts:  1038
Joined:  Wed Feb 17, 2016 5:33 pm
#287391
Peak photosynthesis(Chlorophyll absorption) occurs in blue and red. From my understanding, photosynthesis happens across the entire visible light spectrums. It may be less efficient in yellow, orange and green but it does occur. There is some debate on the subject and I'm not a photosynthesis expert either. Lol

Like you said, if you're using direct sunlight, you won't have to worry about artificial lighting.
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By Benurmanii
Posts:  2000
Joined:  Fri Aug 07, 2015 4:34 pm
#287392
Smooter80 wrote:I don't think anyone is is being snide. When you post statements that are incorrect, expect to be corrected, it's happened to me.

I've read about and researched an obsessive amount on CPs daily for a year and am still a complete noob. Get off of the defensive and you'll learn a lot more. ;)
I do think that KK's original comments were a bit snide. While I understand that's its frustrating to see misinformation spread by newbies, and I myself have often come across as snide or rude, I believe that its best to just give the information when this occurs, no extra commentary, like "haha". I'm not trying to attack KK for pointing this out, but I've noticed there is some eltitism and "posh" language/attitude that people pick up as they become better known in the CP community and as more people look up to them. I have seen this attitude in myself sometimes, and while I am usually blunt with info (I just try to leave corrections at "no" or "this is incorrect"), I have been working to try to be friendlier to people who are still learning, but without necessarily sugar coating everything (such as telling people "who knows? Maybe your conditions will work for you!", it is better to know someone that, while there may be a chance of success, there is a high likelyhood of failure, than letting them spend a bunch of money on a plant they will kill).
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By KategoricalKarnivore
Posts:  1725
Joined:  Wed Aug 24, 2016 5:00 pm
#287398
I agree. My remarks were a little snide. Sometimes a snide remark leaves a more lasting impression. And it wasn't because of some elitism (I have noticed that as well). I am a noob at CPs. No expert here. It was to get a conversation going which is exactly what happened. It was to draw attention to the fact that the info posted was wrong. And it was the first post you made. Could I have done it in a different way? Sure. But the way I went about it got the job done in the end. I'm sorry if I offended you DRBeck, that was not my intention. I just wanted to drive home the fact that what you posted was not fact. I'd like to thank everyone who chimed in to give correct info.
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By nimbulan
Posts:  2077
Joined:  Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:03 pm
#287411
Smooter80 wrote:Peak photosynthesis(Chlorophyll absorption) occurs in blue and red. From my understanding, photosynthesis happens across the entire visible light spectrums. It may be less efficient in yellow, orange and green but it does occur. There is some debate on the subject and I'm not a photosynthesis expert either. Lol

Like you said, if you're using direct sunlight, you won't have to worry about artificial lighting.
Yep that is correct that peak absorption happens in red wavelengths but the the leaves still absorb 80-90% of green light, generally. Apparently how it works is that green light can actually penetrate deeper into the leaf and the small amount of green light reflectivity helps the green light reach more chloroplasts inside the leaf. So once the surface-layer of chloroplasts is saturated, red and blue light don't do you much good and only green light can provide further benefit to the plant. Of course you need pretty intense light to get to this point and most of us probably aren't using lights that bright for our plants, but green light still benefits the plant at lower intensity.
By DRBeck
Posts:  11
Joined:  Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:15 am
#287422
No worries. However, I think it's helpful to point out errors and expand on explanation. I have no idea where my errors lied. For example, green is green because green light is reflected just as white cars stay cooler than black cars because white is essentially reflecting the entire visible spectrum. Plants, use red and blue light to produce chlorophyll, but those colors are not appealing to the eye.

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By DRBeck
Posts:  11
Joined:  Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:15 am
#287423
I also made the mistake of lumping Drossera into one species which was clearly my error... D. Aliciae does not need a dormancy. I cannot speak to other sub-classes. Please correct me and/or elaborate on other areas that where inaccurate. Frankly I can't recall the original topic and I am too tired to look [WINKING FACE].

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By nimbulan
Posts:  2077
Joined:  Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:03 pm
#287431
DRBeck wrote:I also made the mistake of lumping Drossera into one species which was clearly my error... D. Aliciae does not need a dormancy. I cannot speak to other sub-classes. Please correct me and/or elaborate on other areas that where inaccurate. Frankly I can't recall the original topic and I am too tired to look [WINKING FACE].

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The OP was originally asking if he could use a regular light bulb to supplement light for his sundew during winter, since natural light is a bit lacking. Lots of people do that, especially for small collections, and it certainly works.
By Benurmanii
Posts:  2000
Joined:  Fri Aug 07, 2015 4:34 pm
#287446
DRBeck wrote:I also made the mistake of lumping Drossera into one species which was clearly my error... D. Aliciae does not need a dormancy. I cannot speak to other sub-classes. Please correct me and/or elaborate on other areas that where inaccurate. Frankly I can't recall the original topic and I am too tired to look [WINKING FACE].

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Drosera is one of the most diverse genus of carnivorous plants. They can be found in North America, Canada, Central American, South America, Africa, Europe, Asia, the Philippines, and Australia + New Zealand.

They have a diverse range of growth types and dormancies. Many from the temperate ranges form tight buds during the freezing winters. These buds are called hibernacula, and it protects them from desiccation and frostbite. Many species from Australia only grow during the mildly winters, and when the hot summers come along, they form an underground tuber (like a potato) to store energy and nutrients. They then die back to just the tuber, and when for the cool, rainy season tickets begin again. Some species from South Africa have a similar process, but instead die back to thick roots during the summer (D. aliciae is not one of these).
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