Highland cooling system

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iamjacksplants

 
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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sun Sep 25, 2016 10:22 pm

Well it gets up to about 80% humidity. I have the fogger plugged in to the same power strip as the lights to kind of regulate it a little bit otherwise it gets to 100%. I have a humidity controller but I haven't set it up yet. That sensor is pretty far from the fogger too. I know it's much higher in other parts of the enclosure. Temperatures fluctuate in different parts as well. I think the fans will even that out. I would like to get a couple more sensors too.

Yes, the lowest temperature is the night temp. The lower humidity is the night value as well. It's a little more difficult to cool a humid environment. Even with the fogger off it hovers around 50%.

Cheers,
-@.
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Re: Highland cooling system

by tannerm » Sun Sep 25, 2016 10:27 pm

iamjacksplants wrote:Well it gets up to about 80% humidity. I have the fogger plugged in to the same power strip as the lights to kind of regulate it a little bit otherwise it gets to 100%. I have a humidity controller but I haven't set it up yet. That sensor is pretty far from the fogger too. I know it's much higher in other parts of the enclosure. Temperatures fluctuate in different parts as well. I think the fans will even that out. I would like to get a couple more sensors too.

Yes, the lowest temperature is the night temp. The lower humidity is the night value as well. It's a little more difficult to cool a humid environment. Even with the fogger off it hovers around 50%.

Cheers,
-@.
you want as close to 100% as possible at night. And 85% during the day, from what I've read/heard.

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Re: Highland cooling system

by Benurmanii » Sun Sep 25, 2016 10:28 pm

For most Neps, higher humidity at night doesn't really matter. However, I try to raise the humidity at night with my setup, because why not?

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Re: Highland cooling system

by tannerm » Sun Sep 25, 2016 10:29 pm

Benurmanii wrote:For most Neps, higher humidity at night doesn't really matter. However, I try to raise the humidity at night with my setup, because why not?
agreed. I've just heard closer to 100% at night. Lower temp drop, higher humidity drop

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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sun Sep 25, 2016 11:02 pm

In my experience, with my previous setup, the plants seem to do quite well with humidity around 85-90% during the day and dropping to 50 or 60 at night. I found a lot of problems with the enclosure and controlling the environment when humidity reached 100% for long periods. Leaks, mold, algae, rot etc.

Also, in many of the climate reports I've read on the natural areas I'm attempting to duplicate, humidity drops substantially at night. Makes sense as the heat of the day would cause more evaporation and thus more humidity. Colder air is typically drier air. Also, cold AND wet air can lead to rot and mold really quickly. Especially in a closed environment.

Again, this is just my experience with my previous enclosure and some of the environmental statistics I've come across.

Cheers,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
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Highland cooling system

by tannerm » Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:43 am

iamjacksplants wrote:In my experience, with my previous setup, the plants seem to do quite well with humidity around 85-90% during the day and dropping to 50 or 60 at night. I found a lot of problems with the enclosure and controlling the environment when humidity reached 100% for long periods. Leaks, mold, algae, rot etc.

Also, in many of the climate reports I've read on the natural areas I'm attempting to duplicate, humidity drops substantially at night. Makes sense as the heat of the day would cause more evaporation and thus more humidity. Colder air is typically drier air. Also, cold AND wet air can lead to rot and mold really quickly. Especially in a closed environment.

Again, this is just my experience with my previous enclosure and some of the environmental statistics I've come across.

Cheers,
-@.

Humidity increases at night (this explains why humidity increases at night despite the fact that cold air contains less water vapor: https://www.quora.com/Why-does-humidity ... e-at-night). Also, see: http://www.necps.org/documents/guides/C ... enthes.doc

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Re: Highland cooling system

by Benurmanii » Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:16 am

iamjacksplants wrote:In my experience, with my previous setup, the plants seem to do quite well with humidity around 85-90% during the day and dropping to 50 or 60 at night. I found a lot of problems with the enclosure and controlling the environment when humidity reached 100% for long periods. Leaks, mold, algae, rot etc.

Also, in many of the climate reports I've read on the natural areas I'm attempting to duplicate, humidity drops substantially at night. Makes sense as the heat of the day would cause more evaporation and thus more humidity. Colder air is typically drier air. Also, cold AND wet air can lead to rot and mold really quickly. Especially in a closed environment.

Again, this is just my experience with my previous enclosure and some of the environmental statistics I've come across.

Cheers,
-@.


I increase my humidity at night without mold or fungal problems because I have outside air blowing into my setup. If you do something similar with yours, I'm sure you could amp up the humidity safely. The only plant I have that gets mold in my terrarium (besides the occasional dead prey on some Drosera in a corner) is D. schizandra, of course.

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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Mon Sep 26, 2016 5:41 am

Oops..
Well, unfortunately the ambient temperature at night of the room the enclosure is in is usually between 73-75 degrees. Same outside. I didn't think I could introduce air of that temperature to the enclosure at night without seriously compromising the cooling system. As my focus at this time is achieving the most significant temperature drop possible I believe that strategy would be counter productive.

I do however have an additional fogger. It wouldn't be too much trouble to connect it to the cooling circuit. As the other fogger and the ventilation fan are connected to the light circuit and are off at night, the additional fogger and no vent fan should increase humidity substantially. I may also connect the fan to a timer so that it kicks on a few hours after the lights. That ought to allow for some early morning humidity as well.

Thanks for the input.

Cheers,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
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Re: Highland cooling system

by tannerm » Mon Sep 26, 2016 5:42 am

iamjacksplants wrote:Oops..
Well, unfortunately the ambient temperature at night of the room the enclosure is in is usually between 73-75 degrees. Same outside. I didn't think I could introduce air of that temperature to the enclosure at night without seriously compromising the cooling system. As my focus at this time is achieving the most significant temperature drop possible I believe that strategy would be counter productive.

I do however have an additional fogger. It wouldn't be too much trouble to connect it to the cooling circuit. As the other fogger and the ventilation fan are connected to the light circuit and are off at night, the additional fogger and no vent fan should increase humidity substantially. I may also connect the fan to a timer so that it kicks on a few hours after the lights. That ought to allow for some early morning humidity as well.

Thanks for the input.

Cheers,
-@.

Yes, use the fogger. It will help.

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Re: Highland cooling system

by Benurmanii » Tue Sep 27, 2016 1:32 am

I suppose the extra humidity wouldn't be as much of a problem in an enclosed environment if you have airflow to evaporate the water off of the Nepenthes. While I notice that most Nepenthes don't seem to mind a bit of water on them, I have had some issues with N. peltata getting wet (presumably because it is hairy).

Of course, if things are working now, I wouldn't change it. Higher humidity at night is not as crucial as the temp drop.

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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:06 am

Quick update. The cooling system is getting down to 55 most nights and even all the way to 51 (which was the original target) three nights in a row. Daytime highs are 79, sometimes 80. 99% humidity at night and 69% lowest daytime while the fan is off for a few hours in the middle of the day. Most of the plants seem pretty happy, a couple seem to still be adjusting to the higher light levels. All in all it's working pretty well, which is great since I've been gone for a week now and probably won't be back for several months.

Cheers,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
-Charles Steven Coleman Jr. RIP

"If you had one more eye you'd be a Cyclops, which explains missing the premise."
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Re: Highland cooling system

by 1 Novice gardener » Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:06 am

Hey!
sorry to bump an old thread!

So, iamjackdplants, what did you use in your refrigerator to cool the terrarium? Water? Also, what happens in your tank if the temps get too high in the daytime?

Also, if i use a water pumping system, and if the water is pumped into the tank ,what sort of automated system do i need to design to pump it back to the mini fridge?

Regards

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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sun Mar 18, 2018 8:24 pm

no worries, sorry for my extended absence. Hello again everyone, i hope all are well.

So, iamjackdplants, what did you use in your refrigerator to cool the terrarium? Water?


I am using water bottles for thermal mass only. The idea being that once the cooling fan begins to blow the cold air from the refrigerator into the enclosure, the temperature inside the refrigerator will probably rise quite a bit. The water bottles remain cold. There is a small laptop fan at the bottom of the barrier between the enclosure and the refer that blows air from the enclosure back into the refer whenever the cooling fan is energized. This air is then slowed and cooled by the cold water bottles.

Also, what happens in your tank if the temps get too high in the daytime?


I am using a daytime nighttime thermostat unit from "Sentinel". It has two modes; cooling and heating. There are two dials for temp, one for day and one for night. In cooling mode when the photo cell is triggered by the light turning off with the timer, if the temp is above the set point of the nighttime dial the receptacle on the controller is energized powering the cooling fan and the return fan as well as the "moonlight" LEDs. During the day (when the lights are on) the temp is regulated by the controller based on the set point of the daytime dial. It has been a little tricky finding the set point for daytime that is high enough to not trigger the cooling mode of the controller yet low enough that it doesn't harm the occupants. This system works pretty well most of the time, but in summer when the enclosure tends to get a little warmer any daytime cooling compromises the thermal mass and generally leads to about half of the temperature drop of normal operation. This is typically greater than 15 degrees, occasionally upwards of 20 degrees. On super hot days if there has been frequent or prolonged daytime cooling the system may only achieve a 7-10 degree drop. Recently I have observed only a 10-13 degree drop. So... that coupled with poor performance if daytime cooling is needed prompted some upcoming upgrades. I ordered a somewhat smaller (1.1 cu. ft.as opposed to 1.7) FREEZER last night. I also sourced a 4" butterfly damper which should pair up nicely with bit of pipe I'm using for ducting and help retain the thermal mass in the freezer where it belongs. Hopefully this upgrade will make the nighttime temps more consistent AND allow for effective daytime cooling as well.

Also, if i use a water pumping system, and if the water is pumped into the tank ,what sort of automated system do i need to design to pump it back to the mini fridge?


Good question! Just my personal opinion, and I'm not an ac guy, but I would avoid any cooling system that relies on simply pumping cold water into the environment to be cooled. I don't imagine it would be very effective or efficient without an extensive ventilation system to "distribute" the "radiant cooling"(?). Also if you spring a leak you're in a lot of trouble. Especially if your environment is unattended at the time of the failure. I have left my system unattended (with the exception of someone watering plants and filling up the fogger pond for me) for well over a year without any problems.

I stumbled onto this last night while looking for anyone who has built a similar system.
https://www.terraforums.com/forums/gree ... amber.html
He uses actual coolant (antifreeze) pumped through the radiator of a little fan and back into a reservoir in a chest freezer. Pretty brilliant. AND much more aesthetically pleasing than my arrangement. It's also a little bigger and substantially more expensive as well. He does a good job explaining the system and what he used. Definitely got my wheels goin and I will certainly be borrowing from this design for my next build.

Hope this helps,
Cheers,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
-Charles Steven Coleman Jr. RIP

"If you had one more eye you'd be a Cyclops, which explains missing the premise."
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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:48 am

Hey everyone. So I've been fighting this thing for a few weeks now but I think I finally got it whooped. Still a lot of finish work to do, build a control panel for all the sensors and such, wire management etc. but the system is fully redesigned, reworked and working. Literally TOO well. I kinda put a Ferrari motor on a smart car with this system, but when I double or even triple the size of the enclosure this thing will manage the temps just fine I'm sure, as it is currently maintaining any temp I choose as well as providing any nighttime temp drop I can imagine needing. I'm sure it has limits however I do not yet know what they are. Summer will tell I'm sure.

I'll try to make this as brief as possible, but I'm horrible at that. Also it seems like there's quite a few folks interested in the subject of cooling and since I haven't been able to locate anyone using the same technique I thought I would provide as much info and pictures as possible since it's easier than one might think and really quite effective.

Prior to being completely overhauled the original mini fridge worked flawlessly in my absence from September of 2016 to December 2017! Keeping daytime temps around 78-80 most of the time and of course a little warmer and it struggled some on hot days. Nighttime temp drops suffered a bit on these occasions but no other complaints. Nights were 55-58 regularly (dependent upon number of daytime operations) and frequently hit 51.

Finally a few weeks ago it never got below 62. This went on for a few nights, then it only got to 63. This simply wouldn't due. I figured it was probably SUPER frosted up in there since it's constantly pulling in 90-100% RH air. So I knew this was coming and honestly I was shocked it lasted this long. One of the MAJOR flaws with my design is that in order to remove the fridge I have to disassemble it from the wall of the enclosure. This entails moving the enclosure etc. Essentially a triple black diamond pain in the...you get the idea. I'm just glad I built the thing on wheels. Like I said, I knew this was coming. Still, rolling the thing around is nerve wracking. I'm picturing plants falling over, cords getting tangled or cut etc., or the nightmarish vision of the whole business teetering over like a bakers rack on an episode of I love Lucy. The point is I only wanted to do this once. I would have to disassemble it to the same extent to defrost it as I would to completely replace it. I decided to replace it. I finally found a FREEZER that I THOUGHT was the same size. The online description said 1.1 cubic foot but I figured it was a typo as all other similar models were 1.7 as my current one however they were ALL refrigerators with the tiny little single serving freezer part. The only full freezer was the one I ordered. It arrived. It was not a typo. It was a mirco. It doesn't sound like too big of a difference right? Refer 1.7 vs. freezer 1.1? Should work at least as well, if not better right? I didn't want to wait for returns and finding a new unit, waiting for shipping etc. so I put it in. After a week of waiting for it to fully freeze (I have it wired into a temperature controller) and give me the drops I'm looking for I throw in the towel. I found a 3.5 cubic foot chest freezer that was short enough that I could fairly easily run ducting in and out of the top of the freezer and to to/from the enclosure. It's also at Best Buy and shockingly NOT an online only item so I can just go grab it. I do. While there I see only the 5.5 model on display. It's the same height and depth, just 6 inches wider and 20$ more. I leave with that one. Now I just need a bigger fan, some duct etc. I'll list what I used as well as a few pictures of the steps. It's currently set up to only allow the fan to circulate air if the temperature in the freezer is within a certain threshold. This way the system only operates long enough to provide a few degrees of cooling then disengages to allow the freezer to catch up as well as providing a more gradual temp drop at night rather than 20-30 degrees in less than an hour. It also prevents the system from depleting it's cold reserve during daytime operations. Lastly it minimizes defrosting and won't allow it to run all night chasing the last degree or two of temp drop, meanwhile barfing several gallons of ice cold water all over everywhere. THEORETICALLY. Oh and I was also concerned with the air being too cold, but I haven't encountered that yet.

The components are:
1 - "Insignia" 5.5 cubic foot chest freezer from Best Buy.

1 - "Active Air" 6 inch 400 cfm inline duct fan. [I wanted the 4" 190 cfm but it was out of stock.]

1 - "Ideal Air" fan speed controller. MANDATORY with the 6 inch fan, highly recommended with the 4 inch. Fan and controller from local Hydroponics supplier
* Mine is currently running at just over minimum.

1 - "Ink Bird" STC-1000 temperature controller. [This is used to ensure system only operates if freezer is cold enough.]
*In hindsight I would use the ITC-1000 model as it is a Fahrenheit unit. STC-1000 is Celsius. Both on Amazon.

1 - "Sentinel" BTC-1a Temperature controller. This is the daytime nighttime thermostat. (Amazon)
*currently looking for an alternative as this model does not display current measured temps. Also seems to be losing accuracy. Does not go below 51 degrees. Daytime/nighttime function determined by photo cell, so it must be mounted in the grow area to work correctly. There's a host of inconveniences honestly. Alternatives are expensive however. This unit is under 100$ (best unit by far at this price point), most others are approaching 200$. It has worked well for over a year in nearly constant 99% RH, so it's a great place to start.

1 - 3 prong grounded UL listed 15 surge protector. (Home Depot)

1 - 10 foot stick of 4 inch HDPE drain pipe. (Lowes)

6 - 4 inch by 90 degree HDPE drain pipe "street 90". The other option is "elbow 90". "Street" 90s have a shorter radius than "elbows" allowing for a tighter turn in smaller spaces. I used the "street" type in all of the offsets to achieve a more compact duct run. I also purchased 4 - 22 degree segments and 4 - 45 degree segments as well as several couplings. (Lowes)
I wasn't entirely sure of my duct route and I wanted to have some options. I ended up using all of the 90s and 22s and most of the couplings, but not the 45s. A couple tips for purchasing duct/conduit etc. -be sure to PHYSICALLY check that all the pieces fit together tightly. This seems like a nobrainer but just because it says 4 inch doesn't mean it will fit other parts that say 4 inch. 4 inch HDPE drain pipe fittings won't work with 4 inch PVC schedule 40 conduit for example. Also, when planning an offset know that you will need two of the same degree of bends for each offset. It would be much easier and cheaper to use flexible insulated duct however there are several problems with this, the primary issue being moisture/water. You will have condensation in the duct. The rigid plastic duct allows you to plumb it in such a way that the fan is at the highest point in the system and all the duct work leading to and from can be given a slight grade to allow for drainage back into either the freezer or the enclosure. I believe any of the flexible stuff would rapidly deteriorate into a soggy, sagging dripping, moldy mess in no time.

3 - R6 6 inch or smaller duct insulation sleeves. (Home Depot)

3 - Rolls 3M "Aluminium Metal Repair Tape" 1.88 inch x 50 yards. (Lowes)

1 - R-Tech R7 "Insulfoam" panel 1 inch by 8 foot by 4 foot. (Home Depot) This is for the lids and baffles of the freezer. It is Aluminium foil on one side and very thin plastic film on the other. Every panel I cut I covered with a layer of the 3M Aluminium tape everywhere except where it already had it. This is more for water/moisture protection and because ice seems to stick to the porous Styrofoam MUCH better than the smooth aluminium. You'll want to use a large carpenters square or similar straight edge to keep your cuts accurate and square. Use a serrated blade. A razor knife is a disaster. I used a kitchen steak knife.

I wanted to take more pictures for more of a step by step but I was pressed for time as I wanted to complete the installation with enough time to give the freezer a head start on the nighttime temp drop. For this reason I did the build in two stages. The first was install the fan and ducting on the back of the enclosure and insulate it. Then re position the enclosure where it goes and install the remaining duct work and freezer lids. A couple days later I disconnected the duct at the freezer and insulated the ducts, installed the baffles and thermal mass in the freezer and buttoned it back up. I did not use any glue at any point. I don't want the chemical exposure to the plants and I want to be able to disassemble the duct easily for repairs or modifications. For example I'm going to be taking it apart very soon to install some sort of a splitter just before the fan and another just before the enclosure so that I can use the fan at full force to defrost the freezer without affecting the environment in the enclosure. I just haven't found the right fittings yet. Anyhow, here's the pictures.

dryfite.jpg
The freezer and fan with 6" to 4" reducer and 4" 90
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theheartbeate.jpg
Fan installed where mini fridge/freezer were. It' a BEAST! WAY overkill! That small opening is where the pipe for the old unit supplied cold air. I ended up reusing this opening and pipe and just sleeving the 90 over it.
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warmreturninsulatede.jpg
The warm air return duct.
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warmreturnintakee.jpg
Warm air return
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firstbafflee.jpg
Just one baffle for now. Notice the hole at the bottom. This is on the opposite side of the freezer from where the air is coming in. Just a quick way to slow the air down a bit for the first night.
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pipingandfreezere.jpg
Supply and Return duct work complete. This was the stopping point of the first phase.
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returnandsupplypipinge.jpg
Side view of same
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This was the stopping point for the first phase. The following pictures start somewhere near the middle of the second phase.

bafflescompletesidee.jpg
Here the baffles are complete. These are just the foam insulation all tapped up with the aluminium tape. For the most part it's just friction from the tight fit holding it together. there's a little tape to keep things square and plumb and somewhat air tight. The frost will do the rest. Nothing is tapped to the freezer itself to allow for servicing.
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bafflescompletetope.jpg
Same as above, top view.
bafflescompletetope.jpg (2.68 MiB) Viewed 1024 times


When cutting the baffles I accounted for a dual lid set up. the first lid fits fairly snugly INTO the opening of the freezer. This also sits flush with the top two of the baffles, and the center divider. The other two baffles sit flush to the BOTTOM of the freezer and has a gap at the top for air flow. The other two baffles have the gap at the bottom. This forces the air to travel into the freezer, up to the first gap and down to the next and so on ultimately zigzagging up and down repeatedly before re entering the enclosure. The second lid fits OVER the opening to the freezer just like the factory lid. The gap between the two lids is bridged by couplings thoroughly tapped to the upper lid and rather tightly fit into the bottom lid so that they stick out of the bottom a little. There is a short diagonal cut piece of duct on the other end of the coupling to help push the air down over the frozen bottles in the first and last compartments. Again nothing is glued for serviceability and the diagonal cut is to allow for frost build up without blocking air flow.

downpipee.jpg
Diagonal cut downpipe and coupling.
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bafflesfulle.jpg
Some soda cans 3/4 full of water to accommodate freezing. Stacked 3 high. This is for thermal mass - something frozen to slow and cool the air down. Positioned sparsely to allow for frost buildup without blocking air flow. Hopefully.
bafflesfulle.jpg (2.34 MiB) Viewed 1024 times


innerlide.jpg
Inner lid. The edges and the opening for the down pipe all carefully aluminium tapped up to help reinforce and protect it. Don't forget to make a little hole and install the temperature probe!
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almostdonefronte.jpg
All buttoned up! Still lots of finish work to do, but it's complete mechanically.
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almostdonesidee.jpg
Side view.
almostdonesidee.jpg (2.6 MiB) Viewed 1024 times


Electrical connections:
The surge protector is connected to the output of the daytime/nighttime thermostat as before. The ITC-1000 is plugged into the surge protector. The "HEATING" output of the ITC supplies the power to the fan controller which then supplies the fan. I know that sounds counter intuitive, but it works much better than if connected to the "cooling" output. The sequence goes like this; The thermostat energizes the ITC. Essentially this is a "cool request" to the freezer. If the temp probe of the ITC is below -6.8 C or 19.7 F, it completes the circuit to the fan via internal relay. The fan will operate until the internal temp of the freezer WARMS up to 3.3 C or 37.9 F OR the end of the cool request from the thermostat, whichever happens first. If the cooling output is used, the fan will run full time and the temps inside the freezer will continue to warm ultimately resulting the surprise living room water works attraction mentioned earlier. I'm currently searching for a better controller for the enclosure, ideally something with multiple daytime and nighttime settings for more gradual, accurate and natural changes. For now I'm getting a daytime high of 76 or so and nighttime lows between 50.8 and 53.5 F. The nighttime temp is restricted by the thermostats 51 degree limit and not the cooling capacity of the system itself. It currently runs for about 30 to 40 minutes on the first cycle of night cooling. This achieves temps just under 60 F. It then cuts off so the freezer can cool to -6.8 C again. This takes around 12 to 15 minutes. It will then run again for around 10 minutes then off again for 15 or so. The enclosure is cooled the final 10 degrees by the end of two or three such cycles. It then only activates for a few minutes as needed to maintain the low temp for the remainder of the night. The freezer is plugged directly into the wall and set to the coldest setting. Initially I had planned on using the ITC to regulate the freezer for fear of freezing or below freezing air entering the enclosure. This does not appear to be a concern with this configuration however it might be an issue with a more direct input from freezer to enclosure.

That's it for now. Thanks for taking a look. Questions and comments welcome.

Happy growing,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
-Charles Steven Coleman Jr. RIP

"If you had one more eye you'd be a Cyclops, which explains missing the premise."
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Re: Highland cooling system

by iamjacksplants » Sun Apr 15, 2018 8:30 pm

Almost forgot, pictures of what's inside! Nothing super fancy... Yet... The pictures are in order from left to right or cool to warm side of the enclosure.

coldside04e.jpg
Far left, coldest side. under 75F days, 52F nights. Roughly
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middle01e.jpg
Middle of the set up. The fogger pond. U. alpina and U. sandersonii growing on lava rock and wood. Slighty warmer here. Usually 78-80 days and around 60 to high 50s nights. Sometimes a little cooler.
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middle02e.jpg
Another shot of the middle
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ualpinaflowere.jpg
U. alpina flower
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warmsidefrommiddlewithtempe.jpg
The warmer side, shot from the middle with a view of the temp.
warmsidefrommiddlewithtempe.jpg (2.21 MiB) Viewed 1007 times


warmside02e.jpg
Warm side shot looking towards the middle
warmside02e.jpg (2.68 MiB) Viewed 1007 times


These were all taken at the same time yesterday, so it's 75F in the middle and 84F on the warm side. The coldest part on the far left is around 71F.

Thanks for looking,
Cheers,
-@.
"If you don't ask the question, you don't have to listen to the answer you didn't want to hear..."
-Charles Steven Coleman Jr. RIP

"If you had one more eye you'd be a Cyclops, which explains missing the premise."
-Aesop Rock

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