Venus fly traps!

The musings of Carnivorous Plant addicts!

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Posted by on in MyBlog
Hey hey guys, just updating the progress of the traps and so on.  Before After     All of the original growth has died off but one, and from there more have come in. Hopefully another month and it will be  right as rain.   Then I have a new trap in my collect which is the cupped trap. It has caught the most flies in the shortest amount of time compared to the other traps. Flies just love chilling out on it too even if their hanging around the dead.  As for the progress of Eddie, my first flytrap: Before After He's grown quite well, all the old traps died long ago. Another thing I noticed was that the growths that were going on during the Miracle Gro situation have been stuck in suspended animation. Such a pity but lesson learned. I'm really excited about the first working trap,  the other one never worked so I was a bit disappointed. The mystery flytrap     that I was having trouble figuring out when I got it as a bonus with my pink venus is actually:   A pink venus!!! I was under the impressed that it was a toothed petiole since it did not even look like the pink venus I have, but that's early growth for ya right :) I really can't wait for it's true colors to come out like the other pink venus.   Growth has happend very quickly for all the traps. They all are doing very well and I look forward to getting a very special trap from over seas soon :) I also gave the pitcher plant to my sister for her birthday. It is also doing well, by the next post I'll have lots of pictures to compare each trap's before and after. Quite a journey indeed.  
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I suppose since I will start my blog, it will be basic. I will be keeping a log of my VFT plant growth every other week. I think this will be interresting for me so i can determine the things I am doing right.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Well its been a long time. Been real busy wrapping up school and baseball n what not so I havent been able to stick with it. Although there isnt much to account for. Not sure what went into the other blog but I have 3 sprouts now all doing quite well, one of the seeds fell off one of the seedingly prematurly so now its kind of the "runt" of the group. VFT is recovering from a few sunburn issues and a little to much water I think. Might have been some root rot or something but now I have no water in the tray just spraying it two times a day to keep soil moist. "VFT like their soil to be moist not wet". I had lost quite a few traps but new growth is coming quick and i pulled the plant up a little for curiousity sake and to give it a little air in there. Rhizome is quite big so thats a good sign, might be splitting soon. Sundew doing veryyy well lots of new growth after sunburn incident. All leaves are green with nice red dew finger things. It loves that black flys my flourescent light atracts  and it just overall doing very well. Cactus got attacked by my cat while i was gone and thankfully only suffered one puncture wound but it seems to be doing A ok. Cacti are probably the easiest thing in the world (comparitivily speaking) to grow.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Just a quick introduction.  I've kept VFT's seriously since 2002, but early last summer I separated from my wife and, unfortunately, had to leave my collection at the family home. A month ago I was able to rescue my collection, although I was unsure as to what exactly I'd be rescuing - they had to rely on natural rainfall since last year, of which there wasn't a great deal of from memory. The collection consisted of two large trays of VFT's, ranging from the typical examples, to a some South West Giants, Royal Reds and Shark's tooth, some 32 + pots in total. Upon arriving back home I inspected the grim contents of the pots. However, after tidying up, I was surprised to find that every pot still contained a VFT - some pots many.  All but a couple were very small, so all I can assume is that the original main plant had died and had reverted to smaller scale in view of the 'stressed' condition that they had found themselves in. I wish now that I'd taken some pictures (before and after), but after almost four weeks in a more sympathetic environment, all plants are now well on the road to recovery. Baruc.
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It's been quite a while now since I've written a detailed log of my tissue culture activity.  I think it's mostly because I'm lazy, but it's also because there hasn't been many new revelations for me.  I guess I was also out of town for nearly all of April, so that put a damper on my TC activities.  However, now I think I might finally have something to write about. Putting seeds in vitro has become very easy for me as has replating them.  I have somewhere near 200 Dionaea and Sarracenia seedlings going now in cultures.  Seeds are very easy to sterlize and my sterile technique must be pretty good because I've not yet gotten any contamination from air when plating or replating seed or seedlings.  The only time I get contamination is from explants.  Up to this point, I've been mostly using leaves and trap with very limited success.  The only strike I've had to this point is my one 'Cupped Trap' success.  My next plan of attack is to grow any plant that I want to get started in vitro in my terrarium where they will have a very clean growing environment that will make them easier to sterilize. Leaves should be a pretty easy part of the plant to sterilize because most of them aren't in contact with the soil.  However, flower stalks are the easiest part of the plant to sterilize because they never contact the soil.   I have used flower stalks to start new plants ex vitro, so it made sense that it could be done in vitro. A while back I received an email from a friendly onlooker that had been visiting flytrapcare from time to time.  He sent me an article that has proven to be very helpful.  The friendly onlooker's name is Geoff Roberts of Multiclone out of Queensland, Australia and he has been  tissue culturing carnivorous plants since 1980!  Wow! The article he sent me is titled "Source, etiolation and orientation of explants affect in vitro regeneration of Venus fly-trap (Dionaea muscipula)" and it is written by W.L. Teng in 1998 and published in 1999.  In the article they basically describe how flower stalk explants are used for tissue culturing Venus flytraps.  This has definitely helped me in my quest to get certain cultivars started in vitro because this time of year all of my plants are sending up flower stalks.  I also have received flower stalks from some friendly people that sent them to me, so I have a TON of tissue to work with. I've spent the last two days (Tuesday May 19th, and Wednesday May 20th) putting B52, Triffid Traps, Fine Tooth X Red, Cupped Trap, and Fused Tooth flower stalks into cultures.  I sure hope that I get at least one to take. As best as I understand it from the article and from what information I've gathered from Geoff, it's rather difficult to get the main flower stalk to "strike" and form callus.  It's rather hit or miss and takes a long time if it does eventually take.  The part of the flower stalk that should be focused on is the part near the top where the pedicels attach to the main stalk.  At this part of the flower stalk, there is a little leaf part that envelops the flower buds as they are developing before the pedicel starts to grow and elongate.  The "crotch" between these little leaves and the pedicel is the part of the flower stalk that should be focused on. Oddly, one of my typical VFTs started flowering back in October.  I snipped the flower stalk off after it was a couple of inches tall and put it into a culture.  Once in the culture, it continued to grow, evenually becoming a rather large piece of flower stalk tissue with many buds and pedicels.  Sometime in March, I took it out of the culture and cut it into pieces, but left the entire top area in tact.  I left it like this until a week or so ago, then I pulled it out of the culture again and diced up each of the pedicels.  Unfortunately, I didn't read the article thoroughly enough and I wasn't paying enough attention to the "crotch" between the little leaf and pedicel and was more focused on the pedicel itself. Well, fortunately, I did preserve two pieces of tissue that inculded the little leaf, "crotch" and pedicel and over the last week, I can definitely see callus starting to form there on one of the cultures!  See the photos below: The above photo was taken on the 19th of May.  I put this pedicel into a new culture on the 13th of May and this callus wasn't visible at this time.  I just took another photo of the callus today (May 21st) and it has grown noticeably in just two days: I expect that in the next couple of weeks, this will deveop quickly into some small plantlets.  I'm very interested in seeing how it progresses.  I'll write again soon with updates. Oh, and the other part of this flower stalk that I cut into pieces that is showing some signs of life is a flower bug: If you look at the rigth side of the photo, I think there is a plantlet forming on the top of the photo.  Also, coming out of the center of the large flower bud in the middle-right side of the photo, it looks like another plantlet.  It's hard to say what exactly it is, but there is definitely new, darker green growth there.  I can't wait to see what it turns into. And here are a couple more shots.  They aren't as exciting and I almost didn't add them to this blog entry.  These are a couple of pieces of the main stalk.  I think they are from the same stalk as the photos above, but they could be from another stalk that I put into cultures about the same time. Callus on the main stalk seems to be VERY slow in its progression.  Also, the flower stalk browns rather quickly, so I've put the main stalk on media with activated charcoal to help slow the browning (I learned this from the Teng article referenced above).
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Ok, now i've got some sea legs under me! I got that 1st blog out of the way and now i'm cookin' with gas! Seriously though, i feel like if i am going to blog on here that maybe it should be relevant to carnivorous plants in some way..but then again, may be not. Myabe i could relate current events to carnivorous plants, weaving similarities between venus fly traps and the stock market. Or maybe a sun starved sundew as foreign policy, or a towering sarracenia as looming nuclear tensions between us and seemingly the rest of the world. Of course that would be ridiculous, so maybe i'll just write whatever i want.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Greetings! So i have been on Flytrapcare for a little while and i just gotta say...i am super stoked to be a part of it! I bought my 1st VFT on a whim while my fiancee was shopping for other plants, and since then my collection and passion has grown like a weed! I just thought i would share a pic i took today of the "brood" as of today, you'll notice it has grown quite a bit since day 1. The 2 pots on top (1 holds a s. purpurea and the other 2 typical VFTs) are what i started with...the rest i have added since (been about 3 weeks-ish). I have a post in the Grow List section of the forum with all the details. I thought you guys might be interested to know that a cut up white t-shirt makes an EXCELLENT shade cloth. The pots under it are full of clippings i am trying to get to take and my weak VERY young d. binata that i am nursing back to health (it is so small that most of the roots fell off during potting)...basically everything that needs to be warm but out of full-on sun. It keeps the humidity in pretty well, and i mist the shirt as well to keep moisture in the air near the "experiments". I will update all my pics soon, i'll snag her camera and get some good shots. That's about it, thanks to everyone on the forum for your help and knowledge that you have passed to me...huge thanks go to Matt, AllenC666, Steve D, Adam, and Niels and everyone else who have weathered my worries and questions...it is greatly appreciated. Thanks for welcoming me to this strange and wonderful world!  ~Aaron
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Hey guys, I thinks its about time I updated again. The last time I was talking about my previous plants and the the Dastardly Miracle Gro. This time however I've gotten new flytraps and a pitcher plant as well. This first picture is of Lowes, a typical I got at Lowe's XD He looked really bad,  and is also getting bad sunburn, but I'm confident that he will make a great recover in a few weeks or so.  He's in the right medium, water, and plenty sunlight.  So we'll see right. Next is this guy, I recently went to a plant store across the street from where I live, hoping to find peat moss or perlite. I was unsuccessful, but I did see in the corner of my eye this guy. I was really impressed with the flower it had and just had to get, I'm not as knowledgeable as I am with dionaeas with these plants, but I've read that the principles are pretty much the same, if not more sunlight. That flower really is something, like two hands trying to grab each other. Last but not least is the B52, which I recently got from a well known person in this community, Steve. I must say, this wasn't what I was expecting, I mean I knew this trap was big, but my goodness. I feel like it's going to bite my fingers or something. For now it is sharing a pot with Lowes, later I'll get these two seperated. You can see what I mean when I put my pink venus next to it. My pink venus has 1  inch wide traps, but B52 is 1.5 if not more. Could eat it for breakfast and ask for seconds =D Well that's it for now.   
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I put a lot of Dionaea seeds into cultures on the 9th of March.  Most of the seed came from Steve at flytrapranch.com (Thanks Steve!).  I don't know for sure how many seeds I had, but nearly all of them germinated within 3 weeks or so.  Initially I wasn't keeping the temperature high enough, but once I raised the temperature, they started germinating almost immediately. I replated most of the seeds that were germinating near the end of March.  Then I went out of town for basically 4 weeks and I hadn't checked on them at all during that time.  I came back last week and to my surprise, many of them had grown like crazy!  Most of them are already larger than the seedlings I started in August 2008 and they're only 2 months old! I did a head count on these babies and there are 109 of them total.  Out of those 109, 4 appear to have the all red trait and 3 of them are very yellow and one of those 3 actually looks white! It's very hard to take good photos of tissue culture vessles, and it's even harder to get a good estimate of the size of the plants, but I did my best.  I hope you enjoy! The first two photos are of plants that are growing quite vigorously, but have typical traits as far as I can see right now. Below are 3 red plants and one of the yellow plants.  There is possibly a fourth red one that I didn't count because it had barely grown at all.  You can see it behind the red plant on the left.  It's just a red streak in the agar.  I've noticed that the all red plants grow slower in general. Below is a monster! Below is another culture vessel with one more red plant (center) and two more yellow ones.  One of the yellow ones actually looks almost white! Below is possibly another reddish plant in the right corner of the photo.  It definitely has some red tint to it and it's growing in a very clumped fashion and quite vigorously.  I can't wait to see what these little guys look like when they get full grown. Here they all are lined up on the counter.  All 109 of the in vitro babies!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
It's been over a month since I've written an update on the Cupped Trap plant that I got started in vitro.  My trip out to our new house in Oregon took longer than anticipated, so I didn't actually see the culture for 3 full weeks.  It was very cool to finally get back and see it.  Here are some updated photos: Looks good, right?  It's about time to split it up into multiple cultures.  Those photos will be next!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I made a bit of a mistake today, hopefully it will not come back to bite me (no VFT pun intendend). For the past two days it has completely beautiful out and has been just about 70 degrees (F) and sunny, not a freakin cloud in the sky. So naturally I put my trap and sundew outside to be able to get a lot of sun. but unfortuntly on the second day my VFT got one hell of a sunburn. The outsides of some of the leaves turned completely black, I dont know why things differered from one day to another, I guess it may have been weak from the other day or the UV rays were just stronger today. Not all is bad though, I have a nice developing trap opening up with only minor burns and another one growing swiftly. Also the trap that I fed a spider too is finally starting to open after like 2 weeks. The sundew is doing well didnt get to burnt, just a little brown but still looks good. No new seedlings as far as I can tell but the two that sprouted look good!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Hey guys, I just thought it would be a good idea to post updates on the progress of my dionaeas as they grew and of any new ones I get. That way it would be fun to see how everything looked like from beginning to the future.  So  I'll talk about and show my dionaeas so far which are, Akai Ryu, Dentate, Pink Venus, and possibly a Toothed Petiole. My first trap was the dentate, which I named Eddie.  I got it from a nature center and from there trouble started with "Miracle Gro"  which caused major damage to the poor plant do to fertilizer being present in the peat moss -_-   An adventure in and of itself I ended up here in good old flytrapcare.com.  With the help of the people here, I was able to get the right medium and bring this guy back to life. The sad thing was that a few growths took a beating as you can see with that one new growth turning black and the older ones following suit. I will post pictures of it as it recovers. Thats Eddie, as for the akai ryu it too was in that miracle gro menace, but it was only for a day compared to the week Eddie was in it. It looked like this when I got it After I repotted it in the right soil it, it lost it's large trap which made me really mad. It's doing fine now, growing quite fast with plenty of leg room. Out of the group the akai really is doing the best as far as growing. Then there's the other two dionaeas. Pink venus and toothed petiole both made some serious transformations when they were in contact with the sun. The pink venus is actually a b-day present for my sister, with the color and size that it is she will love it. I made sure to have it for at month before her b-day in June that way its conditioned for being outside. I believe that's all I have for now until the next few weeks of growth or if I get a new dionaea at some point.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
A good day today! First shoot out of VFT seeds is visible!!!!!!!!! Very exciting, was getting worried if the seeds were garbage, but apparently not. Hopefully the other seeds will follow suit in the next week or so. Also, bought a cactus at Home Depot today. Its a very easy plant to take care of it looks like. It is call Haworthia Reinwardtii. While I am writing this, VFT has a new shoot that has completely opened up, much healthier looking than previous ones that were on the trap. Has a slight pink inside and trigger hairs are visible. Fed the plant another spider, the other spider is almost completly digested by the looks of it, hopefully that trap will open up soon. I am curious to see what is inside it. Another trap is about to open with two more on its way, one half way there and another just starting to grow out of the middle of the plant. Sundew is looking good, many new shoots coming from middle. Some are healthier than others which is weird to me. The oldest stem and the 2nd oldest stem are going to probably need to be cut off from the plant soon they are starting to look old and brown. But new ones are looking promising, one has great red beads of dew on it and looks quite nice. Too bad the plant is still quite small.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
First entry: Going to try to keep an account of major events in growth of my Carnivorous Plants. So far here is a rough account of what has happened: Purchased VFT seeds on April 7th, 2009. Recieved them around April 15th. Then potted them around April 20th. Recieve a VFT and 2 Sundews of unknown type not to long after potting seeds (2-3 days) 1 Sundew died due to lack of water, was very dried out when recieved and could not be revived. Repotted living sundew and VFT on same day as disposal of dead sundew. Around April 25th Since then both VFT and sundew have grown a great many new shoots. Sundew-8. VFT- 3 and another on the way. I believe that VFT maybe ready for a split in rhizome, due to outrageous rate of traps that it is produce. Will wait a few more weeks to see if it continous to grow more traps or if it actually starts to grow bigger, to determine if it needs to be split and repotted.  
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Previously, on "Niels and the Insectivores": Yay! A flesh eating plant! ... Oh No! Fungus! And now... The story continues. "Come on Donnie 1, 2 and 3. You can make it!" said Niels in an encouraging manner to his pretty small plants. For weeks now, he had seen new leafs emerging and getting burnt by the huge Fusion Reactor in the sky, followed by new leafs emerging but not getting quite bigger than the previous ones. Tired of playing the waiting game, Niels decided to acquire some more Flytraps to inspire Donnie 1, 2 and 3, and to help them remember what they were growing to become actually. Looking on the interweb, Niels met up with a guy who lived in a small village in Belgium called 'Grobbendonk'. Freely translated to English, that means "swamp-village where a guy lives who once was the president of the Belgian Carnivorous Society" but for all you know, I could be fooling you here. Anyway, purely coincidental, the former president of the Belgian Carnivorous Society lived there and this was the person who was going to exchange plants for paper money with Niels. How stupid was he! Paper money can't catch flies! Hehe, Niels made a good deal here. This president guy sold 6 plants to Niels, but already gave them names. "These ones are called Spider, Cross Teeth, Typical, Big and Red Burgundy" said Mr. former president while exhaling some air. "This plant is a Drosera and is called Filiformis". - "What kind of name for a plant is that!" was the first thing that crossed Niels' mind. "I used to have a cat by that name." Niels however had respect for the names that Mr. former president chose for his plants and decided not to rename them. Back home, Niels prepared the new home for the future inhabitants of Windowsill Street according to a very complicated schematic of the building that he found on the computer after making it. The difference in materials that were used was a lot to take in at once. Peat, Perlite, Inert Hydrograins, Plastic Tube, Plastic Container, Rainwater, live Sphagnum Moss as top dressing. This was a huge step forward in building experience for Niels, if you know that Niels used to build stuff from one material only, namely LEGO ®, and that top dressing should be squeezed on food as far as he knew. "This is no time to be overwhelmed with a feeling of not being able to handle the situation Niels" said Niels to himself, but only on the inside of his head. It turned out to be easier than expected and it became a real nice real estate for real! The biggest condos were sold immediately, and Spider, Cross Teeth, Typical, Big, Red Burgundy and Filiformis moved in right away.     It would now take about 3 weeks before two of the smaller condos were sold to some cousins of Filiformis, namely Capensis Alba, Jessica for informal occasions, and Aliciae aka guess what? Yes, Alice. The building on windowsill street was now getting full, with only one small condo left to sell. An aerial photo was taking by satellite Bubble, the aunt of Hubble, who was a bit voyeuristic. This made her very popular with the other satellites during gossip hour at the hairdresser's saloon. It was during one of these gossip hours that Niels was able to take a picture of the picture taken by Bubble and the building now looked like this:     Jessica settled in next to Cross Teeth and Big, being across the hall of Typical. Alice was a bit shy and stayed in the vicinity of her cousin Filiformis with Red Burgundy across the corridor and Big on her other side. Both Jessica and Alice did a nice job of cleaning the unused condos of all bugs, mostly small fruit flies, and are starting to feel at home now. In the mean time, Donnie 1, 2 and 3 were observing their new neighbors. "There goes the neighborhood", they said to each other, not wanting to show their true feelings of awe and admiration. -= To be continued for ever =-
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Just a quick couple of photos before I head out of town for a couple of weeks.  It's looking pretty good!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
This chapter takes place 3 years in the future when going back to 2005. It was a long hot dry summer day and the Homo Sapiens Niels celebrated his 25th anniversary of escaping the motherly prison. He told stories to his mating partner about plants that could swallow elephants in 5 seconds but of course she did not believe him. Obvious however, was the fact that Niels seemed to be interested in some specific plants, who were taking revenge on the vegetarian animal kingdom for eating their kind, by eating their pet bugs.  Loving as Niels' mate was, she endeavored on a mission to find these legendary plants. Being a meat eater herself and hating mosquitoes, she did not fear these plants under the motto: The enemy of my enemy is my friend! Making her way through the city jungle, she arrived at the Jan Breydelstreet in Ghent and gazed upon a piece of real jungle. It was there, that she found the shop "Papaver" who had some bug hating flora for sale. Not really impressed by the rather passive drowning tactics of a Sarracenia, she deemed an active sadistic Flytrap a worthy gift to celebrate the 25 year old bravery of her mate. "I'm naming him Donnie" said Niels, "because Donnie Darko is a cool movie and I like the sound of Donnie the Dionaea". You could see immediately that Donnie liked his new name, but don't ask me how. "It's a pleasure to make your acquaintance Donnie!" but no response. The Flytrap seemed a bit shy.  Then Niels got the idea that Donnie might be a bit hungry so he took him out for a walk, in search for food. After a nice stroll, Niels saw what was going to be a feast for Donnie, and placed him on the ground next to a nest of ichneumon wasps. Soon after, Donnie was eating his traps full. The relationship between the Homo sapiens and the Dionaea muscipula grew stronger and stronger, but then winter came. Donnie felt tired and stopped making new miniature stomachs with teeth on them. Dormancy was it called, but hibernation sounds cooler! So, Donnie was slowly retracting and everything went fine, but then something happened. Something happened that didn't happen since Niels was born. Winter struck hard in Belgium, with temperatures dropping to -20 centigrade. Luckily, Niels was monitoring the weather conditions and fearing for Donnie's life, he put Donnie in the fridge with a plastic bag covering Donnie, so he would not mistake cheese for flies. It was a painful goodbye, but they both knew it would only be for 3 months. 2 months and 30 days later: "Time to wake up Donnie!" shouted Niels when running down the stairs on the morning of the first day of the year with maximum temperatures of more than 12’ centigrade. Filled with anticipation  for the joyous return of Donnie in Niels' life, he opened the plastic bag, only to find Donnie covered in a layer of semi frozen mold or some other white substance. Not giving up hope, he removed Donnie from his pot as soon as possible and removed all the dead leaves, as well as most of the living moldy leaves. After washing Donnie with tap water, and then rinsing him with rain water, it became clear that Donnie was in fact a Siamese triplet. Niels prepared some kind of neonatal intensive care unit with fresh peat and perlite, surgically untangled the triplet and laid them to rest in their separate beds of sphagnum, where they are recovering from moldy hibernation up until today.   As you might see on the picture, Niels divided the pot with Donnie's leftovers in 4 sectors by means of a sphagnum cross. In the NW sector, you see the main clump that has consistently shown the strongest growth. In the NE sector, the second largest clump hid in the sphagnum forest and isn't visible on this photo. In the SE sector, you can see the third and smallest clump a bit before the Mount Sphagnum emerging from the soil. The SW sector is a barren VFT-less wasteland filled with all kinds of harmless perils... and sphagnum -= To be continued =-
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Once upon a time, not really that long ago, in a galaxy pretty much all around us, there was this Homo Sapiens sapiens called Niels. He was a strange fellow, but no one believed him, when he said he was strange, so he decided to act normal against his own nature. Between the age of 6 up until 25 he spent a lot of his time listening to a few people, torturing many with boring speeches on how life is complicated and we have to prepare, on "bonjour, je m'appèle Niels" in fact means just the same as "Hello, my name is Niels" and on how two numbers can become one by simply putting a + or - between then. But amongst these torturers, also called teachers, were some who had, against all odds, something interesting to say: "Did you know that when you're sitting still at your desk now, you're actually moving at 28.000 km/s around the sun?" and "Did you know that once, you were too small to be seen even under a normal microscope?" This specific group of torturers, called 'the science teachers' seemed to be the worst kind for a lot of his colleague victims, but Niels could not be harmed by their methods. This is when he first realized: "Hell, why don't they put all science courses on one day so i can report sick all the other days!"  Anyway, the scientist in him was awoken and at the blessed age of 18, he left the languages for what they were, abandoned all religious ties he had with the most famous fictional character ever conceived by mankind and couldn't care less for the laws of "offer and demand".  So he started on his  exploratory journey of unraveling the mysteries of life. Biotechnology baby! At that time, he couldn't care much for the plant kingdom. You could put a dandelion in a maze with some fresh water on the other side, it wouldn't move. Not even after three days! Mice seem to be interesting though. Somehow they seemed to know stuff. This became very clear right before dissection, when it was twice as hard to catch them, compared to when you caught them simply to pet them. Between 18 and 25 years old, Niels learned a lot about the chemical make up of life, and how excessive alcohol does funny things with your behaviour and the behaviour of that other gender of Homo Sapiens sapiens. Now, Niels felt blissed and science became his new religion, eager to learn new stuff everyday. While growing older, the mice started to get the upper hand against his eye hand coordination skills and he was in search for some easier-to-handle study material. Plants seem to be the obvious answer, but they were still considered to be boring, which in fact they truly ARE, until (and you all feel this one coming...) he heard about meat-devouring plants. Wandering about on the interweb, Niels visited one forum after another, and finally ended up here...  -= To be continued =-
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Hello, i am a "newby" to carnivorous plants and this cool community, i recently discovered my interest in growing these awsome plants. I currently am trying to absorb any and all information on venus fly traps and sundews. I think i got everything undercontrol with my plants, and always thinking of new ways to grown them. I currently am waiting for my first 2 VFT seeds to come out of the soil. I also have a big mouth im growing from a nursery and 2 regular VFT traps, all 3 in a terrarium. Right now my only questions is, on my plants that are already a few years old i bought, the leaves are bending way over into the soil and then turning black or just getting messed up. how do i prevent them from getting the traps into the soil around them. i put rock on the surface today to prevent the traps from getting wet from touching the surface but some of the traps are already doomed. i was wondering if there is anyways to get them to grow in a nice clump like in some of the pictures i see on this website, the plants look like a small clump of traps. My traps are spread out and in all directions. ill summit some photos of what i am talking about. I was also looking for information on what to do after you get them to produce seeds. Do you have to put them in the frigde like the other seeds i bought from a "grow VFT yourself" or the sundews that are currently in my frigde for 8 weeks. And if you dont have to put knewly collected seeds in the fridge then how long do they last before going bad or is there a way you can get them to stay healthy seeds for a long time. Also any ideas of cool terrarium ideas would be much appreciated. Also if anyone has any really sufficient says of growing them would be much appreciated. Im always looking for cool containers to grow them in. even though i dont have seeds yet. Thank you ALL. I look forward to commits and sharing ideas and stuff. Thanks
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Here are some more photos of the 'Cupped Trap' leaf that I've been able to get going in tissue culture.  It's only been 4 days since I last took photos, but I've been amazed at how fast it's taking off!
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