Venus fly traps!

The musings of Carnivorous Plant addicts!

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Posted by on in MyBlog
I thought it would be interesting to document the growth of my Cephalotus. I ordered this from Steve_D at flytrapranch.com.  I received the plant on June 29, 2009.   Here is what it looked like the day I got it.  Please forgive my crappy Photoshop of my finger, but I wanted to leave the roots as reference - as I don't believe I have ever seen a bare root Cephalotus before. 6/29/2009   About a week later.  You can see the abundant pitcher death.  While it did lose many pitchers, it did not stop growing.  I attribute this to the exceptional health of the plant when I received it. 7/08/2009   9 Days later (after it had been pruned) 7/17/2009 A month and a half later Note the new growth point sprouting up.  I will come back to this in the next set of photos. Also, this is right around the time I started using Better Grow Orchid Plus 20-14-13 at 1/4 strength in the pitchers. 9/10/2009     The huge pitcher on the right is one of 4 that came out of that new growth point.  This is now the largest pitcher on the plant. 11/7/2009       Creation of this Blog and just some phone shots of the plant with a tape measure for reference 11/10/2009
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Nepenthes, i consider this plants a true carnivorous plant, these plants are the largest in the carnivorous plant family. some have been reported to eat baby monkeys, these vine-like plants can literally climb over fences, trees, and almost anything. Nepenthes plants climb on small trees/bushes, which causes the tree/bush to dehydrate; This is a very beautiful and exotic plant   popular:N.ventricosa: intermediate , does not need nights below 60F , easy to grow, found in the Philippines. the pitchers can grow to be 6" tall. top temp: can take up to 100F is hardend off well.This is an excellent plant for first time growers, it is very adaptive and will make great pets in almost every home.   http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/popup_image.php?pID=103   N. deroose alata: also a easy grower, intermediate,does not need nights below 60F, humidity:intermediate.  http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3472/3820665117_ca0208edc2.jpg   N.rajah: highlander:needs nights below 60F, top temp 85F, humidity: high. The N.rajah has been reported to make the largest pitchers in the nepenthes family (about the size of a football or bigger), this plant is not recommended for first time growers.this plant is found in the island of Borneo   http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/rajah2.htm  N.hamata: ultra highlander: needs nights below 60F, top temp 85 , humidity: high, when seedlings they need humidity, they can be hardened off when they reach adult hood. pitchers can get up to 8". not recommended for fist time growers. this is a 'must have' by nep. growers its tooth petolite gives it that vicious look,  this plants natural habitat is in Island of Sulawesi, Indonesia.  http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/hamata2.htm   N.truncata:highlander, intermediate, lowland: depending on the variety: nights below 60F, top temp 90F can take higher if harden off well, humidity: intermediate, if hardened off can take lower. pitchers can reach the size of 40C in height or bigger. this is a easy plant to grow. image here  http://www.hartmeyer.de/Bilder_allgemein/N_truncata_neueKanne.JPG N.bicalcarta: lowlander: needs nights above 60 will stop growing if temp gets below that. humidity: high. natural habitat the island of Borneo. highest temp 95F. pitchers size:grow up to 25 cm high and 16 cm wide. this plant has amazing "fangs" that give it a vicious look botanists are still not sure why they have the "fangs" or what they are there for. this plant has a large root system and will grow better in large pots. this plant is not recommended for beginner growers. image here http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2330/2207468621_09be88b550.jpg N.rafflesiana: lowlander: likes nights above 60F will stop growing temporarily and get leave discoloration if below temp above ^. humidity: intermediate. traps rarely exceed 20 cm in height  although the giant form of N. rafflesiana is known produce pitchers up to 35 cm long and 15 cm wide.highest temp: well into the 80s and 90F  if hardened of well can take higher.the N.raff. is a well known nepenthes this plant is a easy grower but would do good in a terrarium with good lighting. image here http://www.michaelkevinsmith.com/images/n-rafflesiana-2.jpg  N. ampullaria:lowlander: likes nights above 60F. humidity: high can take a bit lower if hardened off well. adult trap size:pitchers are generally small, rarely exceeding 10 cm in height and 7 cm in width. highest temp:this plant is found in places were the N.bical is found so the same as bical it likes it hot. the N.ampullaria is found in Borneo in flat terrain in kerangas forest, peat swamp forest, and degraded swamp forest. image here http://www.hbs.ne.jp/home/s-yamada/ddd.jpg Now we go to "must have" by nepenthes collectors, enjoy N.ephippiata: highlander:likes nights below 60F. humidity: intermediate can take lower. adult trap size: 6" highest temp: 90F since this plant grows low it can take higher temps. the N.ephippiata is found in the island of borneo . the N.ephippiata is my favorite nepenthes, it is easy to grow and can be adapted easily. this plant has no known hybrids. it is still rare in cultivation. image here http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/ephippiata.htm N.hamata: ultra highlander: needs nights below 60F, top temp 80 but they wont like it, humidity: high, when seedlings they need humidity, they can be hardened off when they reach adult hood. pitchers can get up to 8". not recommended for fist time growers. this is a 'must have' by nep. growers its tooth petolite gives it that vicious look,  this plants natural habitat is in Island of Sulawesi, Indonesia. image here http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/hamata2.htm N.burbidgeae: highlander, likes nights below 60F. top temp 80-90 will do OK. humidity: intermediate. pitchers can get up to 25 cm high by 10 cm wide. difficulty: intermediate. this plant has beautiful pitchers.  Nepenthes burbidgeae is a highland plant native to Borneo. image here http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/popup_image.php?pID=73 Nepenthes dubia: highlander, need nights below 60F to grow well and form pitchers. highest temp: 85F can take higher if hardened off well. humidity: intermediate. Terrestrial pitchers are relatively small, reaching 5 cm in height and 3.5 cm in width . Upper pitchers are generally larger, growing to 8 cm in height and 4 cm in width.  not recommended for first time growers. this plant is very exotic it rarely produces lower pitchers its upper pitchers are just, awesome as you can see in this pic  http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/dubia.htm this plant is native to Sumatra. Nepenthes lowii (Trusmadi): highlander: needs nights below 60F to grow well and form pitchers. this to keep this plant in the min 80s can take temps to 90s. humidity: intermediate. this plant will do fine in the 80-lower 90s.  pitchers will get up to 7". this plant is easy but slow nepenthes to grow. this plant have very  interesting upper pitchers. this plant is native to Borneo. Nepenthes rajah:  highlander:needs nights below 60F, top temp 85F, humidity: high. The N.rajah has been reported to make the largest pitchers in the nepenthes family (about the size of a football or bigger), this plant is not recommended for first time growers.this plant is found in the island of Borneo   http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/gallery/nepenthes/rajah2.htm N.bicalcarta: lowlander: needs nights above 60 will stop growing if temp gets below that. humidity: high. natural habitat the island of Borneo. highest temp 95F. pitchers size:grow up to 25 cm high and 16 cm wide. this plant has amazing "fangs" that give it a vicious look botanists are still not sure why they have the "fangs" or what they are there for. this plant has a large root system and will grow better in large pots. this plant is not recommended for beginner growers. image here http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2330/2207468621_09be88b550.jpg   i am still not finished yet i will update this blog regularly. happy growing   Omar,    
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I have no idea what species of Drosera this is, but I'm growing quite fond of it: I'm going to ask around to find out the species.  It looks like it's getting ready to drop gemmae right now too, so I should be able to propagate it this winter.  I'm looking forward to trying to propagate with gemmae because it's something I've never done before. Should be fun!
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I decided to tell a little bit about myself after reading this new post on the chit chat forum. Really I was too lazy to actually type all this out until I got encouraged by a whole bunch of people. Anyways, let me tell you a bit about myself.I'm Carolyn Nguyen, I'm fourteen and am currently in high school. My nationality is Vietnamese, you might have heard my last name, Nguyen from around your area, its probably because my last name is a very common Vietnamese name. I am currently residing in Anaheim, CA with my mother, aunt, and my two brothers, Eric and Derek.**Work in Progress**
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  OK so i wanted to see the growth  of my seed grown ventricosa this is a picture of my ventricosa when i first got it (notice the forming pitcher)  So this picture is from a few days after the other picture was taken OK i will take pictures every 3 days and upload them here. hope yall like them OK like i said i will take pics so i did ........ here they are oh and the pitcher seems to be blowing up   
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Hello people. Just felt like writing big. My VFT's flower stalk is much taller and the buds are getting a little bigger also. I repotted it in some peat moss on sunday!Otherwise, have a happy day! Pickles
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Well I had to change the water because fungus started growing on the pullings. (probably due to the sugar I put in) And the pullings are dipped in a rooting hormone powder, And some of the powder Is mixing about with the seeds. So hopefully It'll help them out a widdle bit. ;p  I'm keeping track of them on a witheboard I have So My next post will be when they germinate, and then continuing on after that.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
So after I dunno how many days I found a seed pod in one Of My drosera's flowers YAY!... Now what? well I thought I might try out growing them in water, So i immediately plopped them in the water with my vft pullings. (all of my home grown plants started out in water and I don't intend to brake the tradition) So I have no Idea what these seeds look like or whatever colour they are, So I may of even just put some bits of dust with my pullings. I'm no proffesionals like all you guys so nothing has been sterilized I'll just have to watch everything carefully. ;] Now we will play the waiting game, does anyone know how long it'll take for the seeds to germinate?
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Posted by on in MyBlog
What's a "blog"? i have no idea what it is.. or umm what too do .. can anyone please help me with explain? pleeeaaasssesee
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I started a lot of cultures from flower stalks I was able to harvest in early to mid June.  I was fortunate enough to get many of them to take and I now have quite a few different varieties going in cultures. I posted an initial thread on the Red Piranha here:Red Piranha and Cupped Trap cultuersI posted an update of these cultures in the forum just about two weeks ago: Various Venus flytrap tissue cultures but their growth since then is already fairly noticeable. I just wanted to post an update of these cultures to give people an idea of how fast they can grow. Jaws: Red Piranha (for some reason this one isn't progressing as quickly): Petite Dragon (check out the bizzare flowering that's taking place on that piece of tissue that used to be a flower bud): Czech Giant: Fang:
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I put seed that I acquired from Steve Doonan of flytrapranch.com in vitro on March 9th.  I had written a couple of blog entries updating their growth:Dionaea Seedlings in vitro Dionaea Seedlings in vitro - Update #1 Well, two weeks and two days ago on August 6th, I took some of them out of their safe little jars and brought them into the world.  You can see a thread I started with photos here:Dionaea seedlings forum post I thought that I would provide a little update on their status now that they've been ex vitro for two weeks.  They're doing great!  They look a little dried out, but I'm guessing that this is normal for plants coming out of 100% humidity into 40% humidity.  I kept them wrapped under plastic wrap for 2 weeks to artificially raise the ambient humidity for them and the last two days they've been on their own with whatever humidity level is in the house, which is around 40% right now. A shot of most of them in their tray: And now for some closeups of some of them: And now some shots of the most promising looking one.  It appears to be a red sawtooth plant:   Thanks for looking!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
After a while of digesting a flying ant, my flytrap finally opened up! I took the yucky ant out. It looked very flat...^^     Just wanted to wirted something.
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Gawsh I love the title font. Well anyways This is about the title and I will be documenting the growth of my future drosera spathulata (fraser island form) seeds.   This is Ernie He is the start of the cycle. ;p   The circled part are the seeds, well seeds in the making. ;]Further updates will be released when The seeds develop. Oh yeah I'd like to thank Matt for making it possible for the making of this blog. ;]        
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Posted by on in MyBlog
After a long-term problem with the blog.........Hi. uh.......   I am bored and happy. I worked in the yard for 5 hours. But i made some money at least. I moved my VFT into a new jar but there isn't much condensation in there. Oh wel,just gotta keep misting it!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
I've always wanted to see carnivorous plants in the wild.  When I was younger, my parents would buy me books about carnivorous plants and I'd read them with wild enthusiasm dreaming about going to the Carolinas and the Green Swamp to see them growing in the wild. Unfortunately I haven't yet gotten to see Sarracenia (picther plants), Drosera (sundew) or Dionaea (Venus flytraps) growing in the wild, but I definitely still want to. I just recently relocated from Boulder, Colorado to Ashland, Oregon.  I knew that Darlingtonia californica, the Cobra plant, grew in the wild in southern Oregon and norther California, but for some reason, I never thought that I'd be able to see one. Yesterday, August 21st, 2009, Leah (my wife) and I decided to take a trip down the gorgeous Smith River to find a good swimming hole.  From our home in Ashland, Oregon it's a gorgeous drive down the Rogue River Valley to Grants Pass and then we hit the Redwood Highway (highway 199) and head toward the coast.  The Smith River is my favorite all time river.  It's astoundingly gorgeous. I had been down there numerous times.  I went a couple times when I came out looking for places to live in January and then we've been down there twice since moving here in late July.  Every time we'd driven down that way, I've taken note of a "Botanical Trail" that's about 15 miles outside of Crescent City.  I'd always wondered what type of plants the trail led to, but hadn't yet stopped to check it out.  Well, yesterday we did! Leah had searched online and found out that the "Botanical Trail" is also called the Darlingtonia Trail.  I couldn't wait to see my first carnivorous plants in the wild and this batch of Darlingtonia californica certainly didn't disappoint me!  As you can see by the expression on my face in some of these photos, I was so excited and happy about seeing these plants in the wild. I think I'm in heaven! A large Darlingtonia with a hand in the frame for size reference.  These things were much larger than I had anticipated! Thanks for looking!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
Okay... I'm going to get some Venus Fly Traps. Yay!!! I am very excited. I'm still wondering what to get. I will post some pictures when I get my new plant(s.)This is probably the shortest blog, but a blog can be any length. Yay!!!
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Posted by on in MyBlog
So Leah and I finally made the move to Ashland, Oregon.  Since getting settled in, I've got my new greenhouse set up!  I'm very excited about that.  It gives me plenty of room to expand my collection. Unfortunately I kept most of my collection inside under fluorescent lights this spring in order to try to keep them cleaner so I could gather tissue for tissue culture.  When we arrived here in Ashland, I planned to just put them out in the greenhouse and let them acclimate.  I had no idea that the temperatures would be over 100°F the week we got here.  Between the heat and the intense sun that they weren't used to, most of them burned to a crisp! The plants in these photos were either outside when we were living in Boulder, have recovered or, for one reason or another, weren't affected as badly by making the move from fluorescent lights to direct sunlight. A shot of my greenhouse and the view from the backyard: Below are a few quick and dirty photos of my collection. Bohemian Garnet: Cudo: An "All Green" variety of Venus flytrap named "Grün": 'Cupped Trap': A mess of Dionaea seedlings: A mess of Sarracenia leucophylla "Hurrican Creek White" seedlings: Drosera intermedia (sundew) closeup: Drosera Capensis "alba" (all white) flower: Pot full of Drosera intermedia getting ready to flower: Drosera tokaensis Drosera tokaensis flower Drosera dielsiana Dionaea "Shark's Teeth" with a meal: Dionaea "Jaws X Petite Dragon" Dionaea "Jaws X Petite Dragon" unopened trap "Fuzzy Tooth" 'Fused Tooth': Some shots of typical Venus flytraps: Chowing down! A bit of nice color: Hope you enjoyed the tour of the new greenhouse!
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I started a flower stalk in a culture way back in November.  It was teeny tiny then, but it grew a lot in cultures and I replated it quite a few times until finally I decided to cut it up into pieces.  Shortly after cutting it, I began to see callus forming on a couple of pieces.  I wrote about this in an earlier blog entry. Well, for those of you following, I thought I'd provide some updated photos.  For reference, I'll include the older photos and show the progression. May 19th May 21st: June 13th And now for the buds: Taken May 20th: Taken June 13th: The interesting thing about the buds is that they seem to be putting out flower stalk extensions or something of the sort.  It looks like a flower stalk is growing out of two of the buds.  This tissue culture stuff is crazy!
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It's been a month since I last posted an update of the seedlings that I started in vitro on March 9th.  They're only 3 months old now, but they're getting quite large.  Here are some photos for your viewing enjoyment: You can see one of the red ones in the middle of this culture vessel.  I find the one in the front of the photo intriguing.   They all grow at different rates presumably due to their varied genetics, but that little guy in the front of the photo looks much smaller and his traps are very weird looking.  It slightly resembles Wacky Traps, but I won't be able to tell until the plant is taken out of the culture vessel. Thanks for looking!
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I think I finally got another cultivar going in micropropagation -- Red Piranha!  It's been a while since I got Cupped Trap established in vitro.  It's in the process of propagting now.  I have quite a few cultures of it going.  You can see them below in the front row of my culture terrarium. And here are a few shots of individual Cupped Trap cultures: The propagation of Cupped Trap is going well!  I'm excited to see that a teeny tiny piece of Red Piranha tissue that I put into a culture on May 13th is now forming callus! Sorry for the poor photos.  It's really hard to take good pictures of things in tiny jars.  Hopefully you can see enough to get an idea of what's going on. I'm so excited about getting Red Piranha going in tissue culture because it's one of my favorite cultivars.  Now I can create a whole army of them!  HA HA! I didn't have a lot of hope for that tiny piece of tissue because of how small it was.  I figured that it wouldn't "strike" because in my past experiences, the small pieces usually die before callus can start forming.  I'm so happy that this wasn't the case here.
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