Venus fly traps!

The musings of Carnivorous Plant addicts!

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Photo shared by on in Carnivorous Plants

hi there my name is paul, im 41 years of age I live in Denver colo and ive been working with flytraps for about 3 years now,  almost 2 of that I spent killing them  :(  everything I did failed, I would purchase bran new plants and they would die like a week  later ,lol it sucked, I almost stoped trying altogether.

then I began to really research and study on them, and finally I got a good chemistry going and recently I have had some success and made a few clones,.. I used cuttings from a vft I purchased on ebay, the largest of the 2 I donated to a friend, the other one has been growing nicely for about three months now, its my " avatar pic " at the moment.

I also have a few seedlings that have been growing since july , I also have a small  sundew growing ,and the rest of are cuttings I hope will take soon.

anyway I have not been able to successfully put one of my plants through dormancy yet, but this also something that I want to do well in. just in case id like to seed one of my future clones..

I didn't realize just how many people grew cps  ,  THATS AWSOME :)

I really love flytraps , I enjoy watching a new trap form and open as much as I do watching them catch bugs.

and its true that they don't ever have to be feed to grow well,

but yea im  no expert on it, im just happy to have finally got a few NOT to die on me ,lol  .

on a side note " 4 DAYLIGHT " fluorescent bulbs" have worked really well for me, you can leave them on for long periods of time and it doesn't burn the plants..

 

 

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well first I'ed like to say hi this is our first fly trap today she has spent her first afternoon in the garden after coming home from the garden centre not to sure what we are doing but with the help of this site im sure we will do just fine

Danni and Sev

Day 2

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Hi so this is my first step in building my terrarium. 

I'm currently nicknaming this little guy Audrey for now, (yes I'm nicknaming it, don't judge), If it survives, I'll go out to michaels and buy the terrarium and supplies for step two

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Posted by on in Uncategorized

Welcome to the New and Improved FlytrapCare Blog!!!

All old blog posts, prior to March, 2014, have been migrated into this new blogging tool.

I'm really looking forward to seeing some new and exciting blog posts here on FlytrapCare!

Tagged in: Announcements
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This site has not only help keep my daughters gift alive, but it has given me the skills to teach her how to grow & maintain Venus fly traps !! I would have to give the PEOPLE'S who make all this happen -from the sales to the information being supplied a BIG BIG HUG & THANK YOU !!!!,  “The seeds we have ordered have come to life after 13 days” !!        The on going support & patience from questions being answered, to information being shared is a really comforting feeling to a 10 year & myself  who are fairly new to this hobby. So all in all my daughter & I, are very happy  & very thankful for the excitement & joy you have unknowingly given us. {;~}      So for all the new people this site & store is a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Or 2 thumbs up !! 
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     I am getting board so I am posting another blog entry. I have been very busy trading lately and will be getting a lot of new and exiting plants which are: My first Ceph, A heliamphora nutans, and an aldrovanda. I love this hobby because it just keeps on growing ha ha. In my first entry I did not explain my setup so here it is!      I have a twenty gallon reptile tank, a humidity dome, and a large black tray out side (such as they have at nursery's). My reptile tank has a ultrasonic humidifier which was very hard to get set up, but now works with minimum effort. I grow most of my tropical dews nepenthes and heliamphora in here. In my humidity dome I grow lots of seedlings and rase cuttings to sell. I just got some little baby byblis in there awwaww. Out side I grow all of my vft's pitcher plants and some temperate utrics and dews. I grow them in a cage why you ask? I have one word for you squirrels. They attacked my outdoor plants and set them back a growing season. I built the cage and my plants have not been disturbed hurray!        I hope will try and post again but until then seeya ~Charlie
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Hi, my name is Charlie. I am ten years old and have been growing these plants for a little over a year. This has been such an awesome hobby for me everybody in the community is very generous with time and money. I had a kickstart on plants in December 2012 when I randomly happened upon a carnivorous plant nursery in half moon bay. There I bought my first venus flytrap. I have learned how to grow: utricularia, nepenthes, heliamphora, dionaea, drosera, sarracenia, and others. A problem with these forums for me is my camera won't take very good pictures :( ~charlie
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This marks the first full year of starting of my CN hobby.  I think its more of a year and a half, but I've learnt a lot.  I started out with one D.spatulata, D.capensis and a tiny fly trap, thanks to a kind professor who gave them to me.  Now I have three of each sundew and 4 flytraps, one being the original, two strikes from a flower stalk and pulling, and a flytrap that I plant-sat and was never picked back up. I went through a repotting mess, mites, more mites, over heating, a drought, blasted squirrels, a bad storm that blew a trash can over that knocked over the crate that was covering a few of my plants during a storm, and acquired two pitchers from a friend.  I've attempted to grow sphagnum twice, the first failed miserably, the second...I only have three sprigs from the pots and they look terribly leggy.  And forked over some cash to buy a large bag of peat, because I couldn't keep on buying sphagnum as I acquired more plants, not to mention I justified it by adding some to the sandy soil around my house. I've also recently taken an interest in orchids, and hope that come spring I will be able to buy a rack of some kind to put in the front or back of my house so all these plants can have some real sunlight, rather than my windows and day light lamps. Here's a photo of my plants that I took inside, the pitchers are outside, though I think I should take them in. And if you're wondering, yes that's a wasp in one of the traps, it caught it all on its own. The spatulata need a bigger pot, the original one cracked thanks to some kids that got too interested in my plants while they were checking them out with their bikes.
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I recently purchased a G16 "starter plant" from FlyTrapStore.com in December, during the seasonal dormancy period.  I wanted to show a few photos of what I received so anyone new to FTS can see what they will bet getting when they order a "starter plant" from Matt during the winter months. My G16 starter plant order was shipped 2-day, I received it only 3 days after I ordered it!  Here are a few photos showing the box as I opened it so you can see how it was shipped with care.   The receipt and detailed instructions with a personal "thank you" note were included.  (I think Matt and Leah are having fun running the store - which is a very good sign! :)   A ziplog bag is taped to the side of the box with the plant carefully wrapped inside, including a plant label stick. After washing my hands I unwrapped the little beauty. and just as people have been saying, there were actually 2 plants wrapped together!  I put them side-by-side with a little seedling plant I had for size comparison.  The G16 plants are larger than I had expected for a "starter plant" AND he sent 2 of them when I ordered just one! Into distilled water they go!  (following the instructions to the letter :) Thanks to Matt and Leah I have 4 awesome plants now!  2 G16's and 2 DC XLs!  Now I just need to be patient and wait for spring to come!
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Hello everyone! SO I have quite a few nepenthes to add here and it would be an understatement to say I'm out of room! I had to resort to hanging a few off the sides and moving the more hardy nepenthes completely out of the tank altogether! If you are curious as to what all I have in my collection I thought I should post my grow list link here as well. So without further adieu.... The very full 40+ gallon tank. N. Albomarginata- The white collar is used to lure termites to a tasty treat :P N. Eustachya X Maxima N. Robcantleyi QOH X KOS just starting to open it's newest pitcher today! N. Sibuyanensis X Lady Pauline N. Viking X Ampullaria flower that had just appeared last month seems to have been self pollinated (Not 100% sure though). I asked on a forum about this single strange flower and several members agreed that this looks to be one of the few rare nepenthes that has both male and female flower parts present on the same plant!  N. Petiolata X Burkeii  N. Maxima X Platychila N. Ventricosa X Robcantleyi KOS also just opening up. This cross is supposed to be one of the nicer robcantleyi crosses out there so we'll see :D So far he's just tubby and green... N. Bellii X Robcantleyi QOH putting on his first pitcher for me. And to save the best of this months nepenthes for last before we start on the other carnivorous plants..... Nepenthes VOGELII! He just arrived and has already won my heart.   On to the others- Pinguicula 'Pirouette' P. 'Sethos' P. Planifolia is a VERY red ping once mature and is also somewhat semi-aquatic. You can see I keep these two separate from the other pings in their own little glasses so I can raise the water up. I keep the water line right to the top of soil except for once a month where I raise it all the way up to the top of the glass and actually submerge most of the plant underwater. So far they are loving it! Slow growers but fairly easy if you keep the water high.  And last of all my little cephys :) Cephalotus 'typical'   Thanks guys for taking a look! Remember I order all posts by date so if your interested in backtracking the collection and seeing the monthly progress just search "ashland nepenthes" and follow by date! Have a great day! :D
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Entry #2 So I have a few new plants in the collection! N. Burbidgeae x Platychila   N. Fusca (Mamut)-   N. Aristolochioides x Maxima, N. Robcantleyi X Bellii, N. 'Gentle' and N. 'Miranda' already lost their pitchers due to the shock of being shipped and repotted :/ But I will post some pictures once they put on some new pitchers. Also as an update I lost the N. Tenteculata I had recently received on ebay. It was smaller than I thought and had some disastrous shock after mailing and being put in new conditions! I have read this is slightly common with the Tenteculatas and once the greenhouse is up I may try again with a little more caution.  In the mean time my Robcantleyi X Maxima that had not pitchered last time I posted just put on it's first pitcher for me!   N. Robcantleyi X Maxima- It has the striped peristome I was so hopeful for! I would have gotten a closer picture but he is in my tightly packed tank and I didn't want to risk getting him out :P   And just to show you how packed my little home setup is until the greenhouse in the garage is up I took some pictures. The bigger tank is only a 20 gallon and the smaller 10 gallons. In total 17 plants. Most of them in 6" pots. It's nepenthe Jenga....... Time for an upgrade.... Also my N. Viking X Ampullaria is starting to put on a flower bud!!!! I got a few pings on e-bay too! The crumbles on the leaves are crushed fish pellets that I use to feed the nepenthes. P. 'Pirouette' P. 'Sethos' P. Moctezumae - That I am growing out from a leaf cutting from Matt and Leah. And my one and only regia seedling! D. Regia- Hopefully I can keep him alive. Supposedly losing them at this age is common... Cephalotus from work!! I took some small divisions and leaf cuttings right after I got him so hopefully I can get a little community going :D
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I just got my first Venus Flytrap.  It is small, but has four mouths.  It has eaten two flies in the past week and I have watered it once with rain water.  
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Entry #1 So this will be the start to hopefully a fairly regular update on my CP collection that consists mostly of Nepenthes (But I do dabble in other things :P) This is my baby- Nepenthes Robcantleyi (QOH X KOS) P.S. that white spot in photo 2 isn't fungus its just the camera acting up :P Next we have N. Robcantleyi X Spathulata N. Truncata (E) This is a red form. Supposedly the cross between two very red truncata parents. We'll see how she colors up later. N. Robcantleyi (QOH) X Maxima- Not to showy at the moment but being my first blog it will be interesting to see some growth on a few of these later on. N. Robcantleyi (KOC) X Densiflora- Again not the showiest right now. N. Jacqueline X Eymae N. Tentaculata Gunung Raya- So he may be small but he should have DARK pitchers later. N. Maxima X Platychila- I'm already amazed at the "wings" on this guy! N. Petiolata X Burkii N. Ampullaria X Viking- Not usually the type of nepenthes I go for. I tend to like large and tall nepenthes not the "squatty" guys but my boyfriend (Also a botanist) begged me to get one. So I saw this one and its bright red leaf color was a winner. After I kept it in my conditions the red disappeared in all the new growth. Not the same light conditions I guess. Either way still nice!    On to the Drosera! D. Spathulata (Fraiser Island)- Hoping my issue is not bright enough light and not that I was jipped! He should be a nice red color. D. Indica D. Capensis "Alba"- We sell this form at work. D. Capensis "Typical"- We also sell this form at work. D. Capensis "Sunset"- Supposedly this is a selected cross from an "alba" form and the "all red". You can see that this is very similar to the alba but just a slight hint of color giving it a really nice pink glow. I gave one of these to Matt and Leah so hopefully I can convince them to TC it and put it in stock :P
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I haven't heard of anyone having a problem using sphagnum moss, but I came across this a few years ago so I thought I might as well post it.  I have no links or article title. There's a fungus that lives on sphagnum moss "Sporothrix schenckii" that can cause a fungal infection if the spores enter skin through cuts or scratches, or by inhalation.  It can be killed by pasteurizing the moss.  This is done by wetting the moss with water in a large pan so it is not more than 4" deep.  A meat thermometer is put into the moss and everything is covered by aluminum foil, except the thermometer.  This is put in an oven at around 250* F until the thermometer says the internal temp of the moss has reached 180* F.  Then the heat is turned down enough to keep it at 180-200 F for 30 minutes.  This is supposed to kill most pathogenic organisms, plant or animal, and leave other important properties of the moss, unchanged.  This works for sterilizing soil too.  Apparently heating soil too high or too long can have "adverse effects on its structure" (no details were given in the article that said that.) Some articles say 140-160 degrees is all right, but I think it has to be heated for an hour then.  Some say it can be done in a microwave, others say not to use a microwave.  Nobody says why it is or is not OK. Something else I've heard is that moistening something then heating it to at least 160* until it dries is also a good way to kill pathogens.  If they are dry and dormant to begin with they can sometimes withstand much more heat.  But moistening them first brings them out of dormancy and the quick drying and high temperature kills them because they can't adjust fast enough.  
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It's easy to calculate light intensity using only an old single lens reflex (SLR) type camera with a built in light meter and the online calculator at this link: http://www.firstrays.com/measurelight.htm  You only need three things: your camera, a piece of white paper, and the calculator. Simply put the paper in the location you wish to measure, facing it as close to perpendicular to the light source as possible, and point the camera at it so it fills the frame completely - trying to shoot as close to perpendicular to the paper as possible without creating a shadow. Adjust the aperture so that you get a decent shutter speed, and then use the ISO setting and those values in the calculator to determine the foot-candles of light intensity. (Note that these numbers are not exact, but certainly give a "ballpark" figure to work with.) For example: ISO = 100 Shutter Speed = 1/1000 second (Ignore all the extra periods between columns, I just used them as spacers.) f stop......fc.......lux......lumens/sq. ft. f/1.4......125....1345........125 f/2........250.....2690........250 f/2.8.....500.....5380........500 f/4.......1000....10760......1000 f/5.6.....2000....21520......2000 f/8.......4000....43040......4000 f/11......8000....86080......8000 f/16....16000...172160.....16000 I made a graph of the data so I can read intensity right from the graph without having to be online when I made a measurement. I used this a lot before I bought an actual light meter.
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First off, here's a link to an article that explains the relationship between Lumens, Footcandles, Lux and candlepower.  I've found it helpful:  http://www.energybooks.com/pdf/D1150.pdf Another little helpful conversion is this:   1 fc = 10.76 lux 3,000 fc = >30,000 lux Avg outdoor sunlight ~50,000 lux = ~ 50,000/10.76 = 4,647 fc (Note that this is 'average' outdoor sunlight.  At noon on a clear summer day, sunlight intensity is generally around 10,000 fc.)   Some additional things I'd like to add about lighting...   Many sites say give them at least 4 hrs of direct sunlight. Others say use indirect light. Considering how pale mine get with high light levels (and many hours of light per day) I would be flexible and just watch how the plants look then make any adjustments. I think I tend to overdo it on the light levels because I'm used to having plants that require many hours of very intense light and I have to provide this all winter or they die.  I was giving 3000 footcandles of light per day to my VFTs, but that started to seem excessive for an 18 hr day so I raised the lights a few inches and now they get 1000 fc which seems ok, plus I don't have to worry about even the little heat from the fluorescent lights. Remember, infra red (heat) is also a form of light and will be focused along with the visible light when the bulb is put into a directional reflector. I have a simple light meter that measures in footcandles.  Normal indoor lighting may not even register on this scale even though it looks plenty bright to our eyes but that's because our eyes and brain can adjust and become accustomed to the light around us.  Full mid-day summer sun is 10,000 fc (full scale). This is how I measure. It is unfortunate that when you look at a bulb you want to buy, the light output is listed in lumens and there is no conversion from lumens to footcandles. Many long straight fluorescent bulbs have high lumen ratings (i.e. T5), but that is the total light output, not how much is going to fall right on your plants (which will end up being a low footcandle number.) That's why I use the spiral compact fluorescent lights. The lighted area is concentrated in a small-ish volume and they can more easily be fitted into a conical-type directional reflector to beam the most light right where you want it. That's how I can get sometimes over 4000 fc from a 300 watt compact fluorescent light using only 65 watts of electricity. I make my own fixtures to be able to position the bulbs as close as possible to the reflector's best focal area. Another very helpful tip to increase your light intensity as much as 20% without using any more bulbs or electricity is to surround your growing area or the open of the light reflector with a reflective material such as aluminum foil or aluminized Mylar.  These intercept light rays heading out to the side and re-reflect them back in towards the plants.  I did this one with cacti one year and they grew better in an aluminized box indoors, all winter, than they did outside all summer. Reflectors: Most reflectors are only approximately parabolic shaped.  I've seen plastic flower pots with more parabolic shape than a metal light reflector.  So look around at anything with the general shape and size you want.  Keep in mind even a great reflector will not give high intensities if it is large.  Look for something small that you can still fit your bulb into.  Without doing a lot of angle measuring with Photoshop, the easiest way to locate the best focal area of any dish-shaped reflector is to cover the inside with silver paint, or, my favorite, aluminum tape found in the heating and air conditioning areas of hardware stores.  Make a hole in the bottom center of your reflector which you can stick a pencil or anything through.  Turn on a bright light (preferably without a lampshade) at a distance from your reflector (at least 10 feet away.)  Aim the reflector toward the light and put the pencil through the hole in the back of the reflector.  When the reflector is aimed right at the light and the pencil is perpendicular to the base.  the parallel light rays from the light will focus to create a bright area on the pencil.  Most focal areas are not points like in math books, they are a much more general location, but nevertheless, that will be the best place to position the brightest area of your bulb.  You will definitely have to use your imagination to find ways to connect your reflector (whatever it is) to the proper electrical boxes, and conduit and have a built in adjustment to hold the bulb in the right position. I'm not even going to try to cover here all the safety issues about grounding and ability to withstand heat when using plastic parts.  I've been doing this for 8 years so if you have a question, just email me. For round bulbs use round reflectors.  For a long tube, the standard fluorescent reflector is useable, but not the best.  A more efficient design is called the "M" reflector.  It looks like a MacDonalds double arches logo.  It is 2 long reflectors that meet in the middle and that's where the light bulb is positioned.  These can utilize light that is normally lost by going "backwards" from the bulb and not toward the plants.  But construction is difficult.  You're better off looking for round reflectors. Spectra: As you know, the sun's spectrum is continuous.  Coincidentally, the absorption spectrum of the various chlorophylls, carotenes, xanthans, etc. also tend to be wide curves (for different reasons) but it means that even if the plant sees light that is not exactly at the frequency where its maximum absorption is, it can still absorb some of the light.  This makes it more efficient.  Nature is like that.   The only continuous spectrum device we have is an incandescent light and these are going the way of the dodo.  When we make light with fluorescent's or LEDs, the light is not continuous.  It has a lot of peaks and valleys both due to the atomic transitions of the electrons in the arc of the gas used and also the types of phosphors used which turn (usually) ultraviolet light into whatever other color we want. To our unaided eyes, the color can look continuous, but it's not.  Companies are working on using multiple phosphors to make a more continuous light spectrum, but we're not there yet and it does raise the price.  Your typical fluorescent, HID, or LED light can gave some continuous spectrum, but it's probably minor.  Most of the spectrum consists of spikes of varying intensities at various wavelengths.  Yes the plant can use these spikes because the chlorophyll , etc., absorbs a wide range of wavelengths so we manage to get by using intense spikes instead of a more gradual, lower intensity spectrum (probably with less heat) that the chlorophyll could absorb just as well.  Maybe in a few decades we'll have perfect light sources like this. As for those purple lights that emit the red and blue absorbed by the chlorophyll, they are not worth the cost.  Having green light included in the light output does not detract from the chlorophyll efficiency.  It just doesn't absorb it in the first place.  It is just reflected away.  That's why leaves look green.        
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  Here is a summary of some of the feeding and fertilizing experiments I’ve done in the last year: I have few bugs so I made artificial food.  I compared the nutritional values of different foods.  I Googled: wheat germ nutritional analysis and found a good site at:   http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/1562/2  Some of the foods I’ve compared: Wheat germ is cheap, easy to make into a paste, has a good amount of protein. Egg whites and whey proteins are greatly lacking compared to wheat germ. I also tried dried baby shrimp (Tetra brand) (actually amphipods.)  They have more protein than wheat germ and almost no carbohydrates or fat, but they are more expensive. I also looked up the analyses of feeder insects for reptiles and amphibians, but nothing stood out to indicate that one was significantly better than another, for a plant, so I stuck with wheat germ and shrimp.  I have dampened the ground food solids with DI water and also with Maxicrop liquid seaweed at about the recommended concentration (about 5 drops per 6 tsp (scaled down)) and had no adverse effects. I have added a small amount of ground kelp meal to the mix as well as ground alfalfa meal with no ill effects.  I've used homemade kelp extracts for years to feed other plants with good results.  Other than the growth stimulants it is reported to have, it has little else the VFTs can use. Alfalfa has one important thing to offer, a well known, very potent growth stimulant called triacontanol (also known as myricyl alcohol) contained in the waxy coating on the leaves.  It is extremely powerful.  It works in low ppm quantities.  More is not better, too much stunts plant growth.  I've never found anything saying how much is in the leaf coatings so I err on the low side and just add a pinch to the wheat germ/shrimp. Liquid seaweed, made from kelp, can be high in K, Na, Cl, I, and other elements. Unfortunately, it's very hard to find an elemental analysis for either that will show the Na and Cl levels.  Therefore I only add a pinch of this also. In general, VFTs do fine on a vegetarian diet as long as the protein level is good. In tests with other plants (typical garden flowers grown in glass vases to observe the roots), I found that my humate extracts would give unbelievable root growth compared to other plants grown on the same low nutrient substrate and given water or other extracts.  I can water some plants with the straight concentrate, but the VFTs can't handle even a diluted solution.  I hesitate to use these on the VFTs because I have no way of knowing how concentrated anything is in my final product.  I already know if applied to the roots, it may kill the plant.  (Apparently, not only can salt-type fertilizers hurt the plants, so can dissolved organics.)  Other people use them for foliar feeding and I would too if not for the expense of buying professionally made solutions.  I do believe VFTs could handle foliar feeding or addition of humates to the trap food. I like using my liquid extracts from kelp and alfalfa and humus because it leaves no solid residue stuck in the trap when it’s done digesting.  It can be done without dangerous solvents, but it can get smelly anyway.  The big problem is that there is no easy way to know the concentration of anything in the solution without specialized equipment.  In general though I can make extracts containing mainly organic compounds.  The pH of my products is below 7 and the electrical conductivity (a measure of dissolved solids) is generally between 0.1 and 0.7. If anyone is interested I can post a list of links to the various sites I used to find the nutritional data. ======================================================= Here is some info about the general effects of plant hormones.  I may try to experiment with these one day, but my experience is limited.  Has anyone tried anything like this to increase leaf or root growth?  This info is from "Growth Substances in Plants", p 96  (I no longer have the link) Plant organs and compounds affecting their growth and development: FORMATION OF NEW ROOTS: Auxins a and b beta indole acetic acid (heteroauxin) potassium indole-acetate betaindole butyric acid beta indole propionic acid alpha naphthalene acetic acid phenyl acetic acid coumarin vanillic acid sulfanilamide methylene blue   ELONGATION (NOT FORMATION OF NEW ROOTS): Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) vitamin B2 (riboflavin) vitamin B6 Nicotinic acid Thiourea   GENERAL TOP GROWTH: Auxins a and b biotin vitamin B2 (riboflavin) vitamin C (ascorbic acid) thiourea beta indole acetic acid beta indole butyric acid beta indole propionic acid alpha naphthalene acetic acid naphthalene acetamide indole acetamide   LEAF GROWTH: Adenine alanine arginine uric acid other amino acids and purines --------- In case anyone is wondering if applying a rooting hormone to the roots or to the water to grow more roots on an already established plant, I've asked about this kind of thing before for use on other plants.  The consensus was that the rooting hormone would only work when new roots needed to grow. It was people's opinions that adding it to already developed roots would have no effect. ======================================================= This is the lighting I’ve experimented with:   As for light, I've used light from 500 footcandles (fc) up to 5500 fc. I generally use 300 watt compact fluorescent bulbs with a color temperature of about 4700K.  They use 65 watts of electricity.  A 300 watt CFL with a color temperature of 6500K ($35 at Menards) uses 85 watts of electricity and they run a bit hotter.  Bulbs with a higher color temperature also seem to have a lower lumen rating.  I guess more electricity and lower light output is the price you pay for the higher color temp.   I use them in well designed focusing reflectors to concentrate the light.  You can get light intensities above 3000 fc. with little heat, and they are economical.  Above about 3000 fc it seems that the plants lose some of the green intensity even when exposed to this light level for a couple months.  They appear to be getting bleached out from the intensity even though it is nowhere near full sunlight which is 10,000 fc.  I would think a couple months would be long enough to get used to light and temperature levels but I saw no indication that they were getting any greener.  Maybe they just didn't have to.  I didn't try adding any specific elements required for chlorophyll production.  I was using a little liquid seaweed in the food and it contains a large number of elements so I doubt they were deficient.   At times I've also used 400 watt metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamp with a color temp of 7200K.  When put into a small reflector like the fluorescents (all my reflectors have fans for cooling) the intensity can be 6000 fc within 6 inches of the open end of the reflector, but even when placed far from the plants, the heat gets focused like the light so plant temperature is a big concern.   HID bulbs generate a lot of heat and trying to filter the heat out of the light beam is not easy.  The simplest and most effective heat filter I've used is a deep (9'') column of water which the high intensity light is beamed through.  Temperatures near the plants would be about 20*F above room temp or in the mid 90‘s.  Without the heat filter, the temp would be near 130*F under the same conditions.   This much water is heavy, needs good support, and needs to be in a container with a flat glass bottom if the light is going to come straight down through it.  You definitely don't want to tip it over.   You can improve on the red/IR absorption of the water by adding some copper sulfate (CuSo4*5H2O).  I haven't tried this yet because it has been easier and cheaper to use the compact fluorescent bulbs.   The higher the color temperature, the more blue light is in the spectrum and blue is better for vegetative growth and chlorophyll production.  I don't want my plants to flower so I avoid the redder, low color temp lights. -------------- I give the plants about 18 hrs of light a day during the growing season but I have a friend who has lights on 24/7.  I've never seen anything recommending that they have a rest period.  So if anyone knows about this I’d like to know.   =============================================================   Insects in the soil:   When I get bugs living in the soil I've successfully used 2 kinds of insecticides designed for application to the soil.  Both may need multiple applications as eggs are generally not affected by the insecticide so they need to be replenished at about 2 week intervals in case any existing eggs have hatched.  I use these to keep gnats from breeding in the soil, but I've used them to kill other kinds of soil pests infesting other plants too.   1.  Disulfoton:  Stinks very bad, not nice to use indoors.  Soil in the pots has to be completely soaked in the solution.  I've used it several times with good results.  Mine is old, I don’t know if it is still available.  I think this is a systemic insecticide absorbed by the plants to kill bugs eating the plant. 2.  Triazicide  I used this diluted to 1/4 recommended strength, also a soil soak.  Seemed to work also but may not have been strong enough.  I don't recall if this is also a systemic insecticide too. ==================   I welcome any comments, questions and discussion. Leilani    
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Got my seeds today. http://s381.photobucket.com/user/trops/media/IMAG0012.jpg.html   http://s381.photobucket.com/user/trops/media/IMAG0015.jpg.html   Got em at 80 degrees F
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Ordered 40 seeds today, 3-18-13, from Flytrapcare. http://www.flytrapcare.com/store/carnivorous-plant-seed/venus-fly-trap-seed  
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I will trade a baby alice sundew for a drosera watari seed or plant just not leaf cuttings.
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