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spore god

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spore god

About Me

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  • Interests

    TRIOPS/PLANTS/ PALEONTOLOGY/ROCKS
Member since
Thursday, 14 April 2011 16:26
Last online
1 year ago
  • paulsflytrap is friends with spore god
  • spore god uploaded a new avatar.
  • spore god created new blog post triops in MyBlog

    Triops longicaudatus I own a triops that is living in an old fish bowl I put some blue gravel  that I cleaned very well with distilled water any gravel works as long as its washed very well with spring water or distilled water and I used an artificia ...

  • spore god created new blog post VENUS FLY TRAP HABITAT in MyBlog

     ok its going well nothings sprouted but thats going to take time but the biodome that i set up is okay i started by buying a kit that had mixed verities im seeding them there and i plan on transplanting um into a tank awsome right? so i have some se ...

  • spore god posted a new discussion

    7 years ago

    Introductions

    Introduce yourself, your plants, and what are your favorite things about carnivorous plants!

  • updated a blog entry VENUS FLY TRAP HABIT...
    7 years ago

     ok its going well nothings sprouted but thats going to take time but the biodome that i set up is okay i started by buying a kit that had mixed verities im seeding them there and i plan on transplanting um into a tank awsome right? so i have some seedlings there almost an inch tall doing well

  • spore god
    7 years ago

    lolololololol

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    im back

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    i wont be back on untill after spring break and my pitchers are shooting up some red shoots

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    whats the point of this blue leaf karma

  • spore god posted a new discussion

    8 years ago

    Introductions

    Introduce yourself, your plants, and what are your favorite things about carnivorous plants!

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    uploaded a new avatar

  • updated a blog entry VENUS FLY TRAP HABIT...
    8 years ago

     ok its going well nothings sprouted but thats going to take time but the biodome that i set up is okay i started by buying a kit that had mixed verities im seeding them there and i plan on transplanting um into a tank awsome right?

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    kool

  • created a blog entry triops...
    8 years ago

    Triops longicaudatus I own a triops that is living in an old fish bowl I put some blue gravel  that I cleaned very well with distilled water any gravel works as long as its washed very well with spring water or distilled water and I used an artificial plant (real ones work to but remember triops love to eat them also I used a sealed sinker one for easy removal triops can move the gravel and if you’re using coral sand then its twice as easy they will dig under and get stuck you can easily move the plant a and free them) just for visual effect then the important part have a small food safe container ( a glass jar works well but I used a small food container from a dollar store) next is water  never use tap water I’ve heard that using tap and putting in fish conditioners but never works for me basically use the same water you use with your vft’s and pitchers I use Albertson brand distilled and spring with a 30% distilled and 70% spring but all spring waters fine but pure distilled will kill them after they hatch from the osmotic pressure if you use spring make sure that you don’t use water that in small print states purified by reverse osmosis, deionization or distillation that would be the same as using pure distilled water now fill up both containers but on the bigger tank ( if you bought a kit don’t worry about a tank but if you buy a small envelope I use these then both are needed)leave some room to dump the left over water in it  now to the eggs follow the instructions that they came with to put them in after you added the eggs into the small container take some black paper and put underneath it makes it easier to see them now leave it alone after 24 hours

     Can I use a filter?

    Yes. The safest filter is an under gravel filter. To avoid the possibility of pulling hatchlings into the substrate and killing them, it is best you don't use an under gravel filter until all the hatchlings reach at least a few millimeters in size. After they reach this size, the filter can be used with no problems. An under gravel filter works best with gravel that can't fall down between the slots in the plate, but it can be used with lesser efficacy with sand. It would not work very well with soil, though.

    You may also use an internal corner filter. In the case of these types of filters, you must wait until the triops are at least 1 centimeter long or they may be pulled into the filter and killed.

    It is possible to use an external filter with larger triops but I don't recommend it except with large tanks. The currents generated by external filters can be very strong, and triops naturally inhabit very still, very quiet pools.

    How about a bubbler?

    It's a good idea to use a bubbler if you're not using any other sort of filtration. Even if you are using filtration, a bubbler isn't a bad idea during the first days of life when you can't use the filter. Triops are sensitive to oxygen levels, just not in the way you might expect:

    It would be very hard to kill triops from lack of oxygen. Oxygen levels must drop well below 1 part per million (ppm) to threaten the life of triops, and even a hot, stagnant desert pool generally contains at least 2 ppm oxygen. Even at very low oxygen levels, triops can survive for extended periods by swimming upside down at the water surface where oxygen levels are highest (they do this looking for food as well, the behavior is not necessarily indicative of low oxygen levels).

    However, during the first five or so days of life, triops metabolize at the maximum possible rate based upon oxygen levels, temperature, and available food. Size differences have been demonstrated in multiple lab studies where all conditions were the same except oxygen levels. They even grew faster when available oxygen was increased beyond naturally occurring levels. Secondarily, although adult growth and metabolism is not as sensitive to oxygen levels as the juveniles, fecundity is affected. Therefore, more oxygen equals bigger, faster growing triops and more eggs for the next generation.

    The drawback to the bubbler is it stirs up debris in the water up and obscures visibility. You will probably want to turn it off for the periods you're observing your triops.

    What temperature should I keep them at?

    For purposes of keeping triops in captivity, the best bet is to make certain that temperatures remain within a range of 22° to 31°C (72° - 86°F). They can survive at lower temps (down to 15°C), but survivability, growth, and fecundity are all impacted. Similarly, they can survive at higher temps, but juvenile survivability is impacted at 32°C and above, and exceeding 34°C can kill adults.

    Both species are found in all manner of environmental conditions. There are populations of T. cancriformis in Israel that regularly endure water temperatures in excess of 35°C during the hottest part of the day.  Similarly, in spite of the emphasis in many of the available instructions about how T. longicaudatus is a desert dweller and requires warm temperatures, many of the populations studied in the wild are in waters that don't go above 25°C by day and may drop to 16°C at night.  However, the general consensus is that T. longicaudatus is the more thermophillic of the two, and most accounts of rearing T. cancriformis are at temperatures well below 30°C.  Just something to keep in mind.

    Important: Assuming you keep your home at 22°C (72°F) or above, there is no reason you actually need to use artificial heating of any sort in spite of the claims of many triops kit instructions (or any of my suggestions).


    A few studies with T. longicaudatus suggest a need for regular temperature fluctuations for maximal growth and longevity. In one study, although the average temperature was the same, triops undergoing diurnal temperature fluctuations grew nine times faster initially than the triops kept at a constant temperature. Similar studies have not been done with T. cancriformis, but an analogous requirement is possible.

    This can be simulated by using a fish tank heater on a timer, 10-12 hours on, 12-14 hours off. Set the heater such that it is aiming for a temp above actual room temperature and comes on in the early morning and goes off in the evening. This way, the heater kicks on in the morning and the water warms up to the target temperature by late morning/early afternoon - just like what happens when the sun comes up with a natural pool. Then it holds the high temperature through the day and gradually cools off through the night until the heater comes back on again - just like what happens when the sun goes down with a natural pool.


    There is a direct relationship between environmental temperature, growth rate, and size. Very similar to the relationship with oxygen described above, triops maximize their metabolism relative to the average temperature they're kept (at least initially). As little as 2°C difference in rearing temperature, all other conditions being equal, results in a definite size differential. Warmer average temps mean faster growing, bigger triops. They also probably make for shorter lived triops - they grow faster but burn out sooner. The relationship is still not fully defined, and this is provided merely as something to consider. However, at least with T. longicaudatus, the consensus of various studies suggests that an average temperature of 25°C (77°F) is the best balance between growth rate, fecundity, and survivability.  As a another issue to consider, there is some evidence with T. longicaudatus that after they reach adulthood they grow faster around 20°C versus warmer temperatures.  All in all, the exact effects of temperature on size and longevity are still not fully understood so do what seems best or most convenient to you.


    Hint: If you use a fish tank heater and don't use filtration or a bubbler, keep in mind that the water immediately surrounding the heater may be much warmer than the water next to the thermometer. In this situation, the thermometer may be reading 31°C but water nearest the heater is actually 36°C and lethal to triops. If you are using a heater but no sort of water circulation, don't aim for a temperature higher than about 25°C. That way you are certain not to cook your triops!

    What kind of light do I need?

    You can use any artificial light so long as the triops are receiving several hours a day. Even the ambient light in a bright room is sufficient if not optimal. I prefer fluorescent aquarium lights because triops are beautifully colored and the light makes them look their best. Don't use direct natural sunlight because it can cause a small container to overheat quickly.

    Some people report giving their triops light 24 hours a day and some of the kit instructions even recommend this for heating the tank. (I hate this recommendation: you can buy a 25 or 50W heater for about half the price of cheap desk lamp) While there have been no studies of photoperiod effect on triops to date, it seems unlikely that this would not have some effect on their physiology. It is known that they do better with a day/night cycle of temperature variation; it would be surprising if they didn't also prefer some sort of light/dark cycle as well for maximal health. It's obviously not lethal, but unless you absolutely must use a light 24 hours a day, I don't recommend it.

    What else can I raise with my triops?

    Keeping in mind that triops will potentially eat any of these, you can also raise fairy shrimp and daphnia with your triops. These two species also produce desiccant resistant eggs and hatch out under the same conditions as triops. Fairy shrimp can grow large enough that triops won't eat them if there's enough easier to catch food available. Daphnia, unfortunately, are too bite sized to resist and eventually are wiped in most cases. Another candidate for tank mates are aquatic snails. Although not generally natural cohabitants of triops, they do well together and the snails can help to control algae in the container.

    The Golden Apple Snail - Pomacea (Pomacea) bridgesii shown here is particularly recommended as it is interesting, doesn't eat your plants, doesn't reproduce very fast and is easy to get.

    Note: like plants, permanent aquatic residents such as snails will need their own accommodations while the triops container is being dried between generations.

    All info is gathered by my research and experience yes I do know what I’m talking about since I’m getting a degree in biology I know tons about triops and a lot about plants but I don’t know everything that’s why I joined this site was to learn more and I find people who aren’t scientist and are just regular people help with my learning because they do this as a hobby and know a whole lot but I really suggest that you guys take a look at triops and give them a go there easier to care for then a blade of grass

  • spore god
    8 years ago

    ???

  • spore god posted a new discussion

    8 years ago

    Introductions

    Introduce yourself, your plants, and what are your favorite things about carnivorous plants!

  • spore god replied to Introductions
    8 years ago

    thanks its just really hard to find somebody whose intrested in both so i decided that maybe people would like to know about the universe

  • spore god posted a new discussion

    8 years ago

    Introductions

    Introduce yourself, your plants, and what are your favorite things about carnivorous plants!

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