Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

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Fishkeeper

 
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Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Fishkeeper » Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:29 pm

I have a really cool piece of driftwood (from a lake, no salt, don't worry) that I want to mount some stuff on. I need suggestions.

I already have a mini moth orchid that was doing badly in a terrarium and will hopefully like its spot wedged into a cranny with a bunch of LFS, a bit of rabbit's foot fern rhizome that I'm rooting into a different spot of LFS, and a piece of Christmas cactus that I'm rooting before I try to mount it.

The driftwood is near but not directly in front of a South-facing window, and I may move it around a bit to get it into a place that the moth orchid likes. As far as I'm aware, it, the fern, and the cactus (actually an epiphyte) will like the same conditions. I hope to keep humidity up with misting and moss wrapping, and may put it over a tray if I need to.

Any suggestions on plants that can put up with lowish humidity, don't need bright lights, and happily grow mounted on wood? I know a lot of tillandisas might work, but I'd like some other suggestions. Ferns, unfussy orchid species, maybe really easy bromeliads, that sort of thing. Preferably things that don't mind being watered with tap water.

Are there any fungi that could be grown like this without badly degrading the wood they're on? I'll gladly take non-plant suggestions for things that grow on wood.

Or are there any plants that aren't technically epiphytes but can be grown in just a tiny bit of dirt? I've seen prickly pear cactus growing in trees, where they've rooted into just a tiny amount of rotted leaves, and they grow really well like that.

Also, what would be the best way to fertilize a collection of epiphytes? I imagine something spritzed onto the leaves/roots/relevant parts would be the best option.

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Aozora

 
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Re: Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Aozora » Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:46 am

There are actually quite a few plants that you could use, but i dont know their latin or english names (only the dutch ones :p). Ill try to figure it out after im back from work.

But a mexican pinguicula should be able to survive on a piece of wood as they dont require a lot of water (but needs to be rain).

As for fertiliser you need to dissolve some in water and spray it on the (depening on the plant) leaves or roots.

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Sakaaaaa

 
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Re: Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Sakaaaaa » Wed Jan 11, 2017 2:10 pm

What about some slime mold? For a plant why not staghorn fern.

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Aozora

 
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Re: Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Aozora » Wed Jan 11, 2017 6:12 pm

https://www.lifestyle.com.au/plant-guide/epiphytes.aspx

Might want to check out this link. My personal favorite is the tillandsia.

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Fishkeeper

 
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Re: Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Fishkeeper » Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:43 pm

I'd sure be willing to try a slime mold if I could get one going and keep it happy. No idea where to get one, though.

Any suggestions for smallish broms that do well as houseplants? Are grocery store broms worth a try or just doomed from the start?

I definitely have staghorn ferns on my list. Any source recommendations for those and other epiphytes? I'd prefer small-but-healthy cheap plants that I can grow rather than larger, more expensive ones.

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Fishkeeper

 
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Re: Epiphyte houseplant suggestions?

by Fishkeeper » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:30 am

Went to a Lowes that actually had a pretty good houseplant selection. Picked out my favorite type of tillandsia and the healthiest-looking orchid I could find.
Image
Tillandsia meduseae, wedged gently into a gap. Gave it a pretty thorough misting when I got it, and I can take it off for a soak if need be. I'm going to stick to misting unless it looks dehydrated, though.
Image
Cattleya orchid, no flowers but lots of healthy (if thirsty) roots. The roots are a bit on the darker side, but I'm not surprised, it didn't have much light. It was in a loose bark mix that wasn't decayed at all, and I left whatever media they were clinging onto on the roots. There's LFS moss tucked behind and around the root ball to help retain moisture.

The stump is near a South-facing window, but off to the side so the light is indirect. Both orchids are on the side of the stump closest to the window. The tillandsia is opposite the window with its leaves where the light will fall on them, and I can move it if it doesn't get enough light. The fern is near the window, but in front of the windowframe so it doesn't get too much light.


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